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Found 11 results

  1. Get a professional mix to make your songs sound great - free. Female vocal only. Arranged; Mixing; Vocal Tuning ; Mastering - free. suvorin@gmail.com
  2. With DAWs becoming more feature laden the decision to buy additional software for a specific purpose is less and less necessary, for instance, Studio One has many mastering tools already included in the professional version of their program. Cakewalk has mastering chains built into Sonar Platinum with everything you basically need to master, so why would a person want another program dedicated to mastering? The best answer - Because there are programs that make the job easier and more efficient. Since mastering is considered to be another area of expertise many simply turn to the pros to master since they would rather trust someone else with their projects. This isn't a bad idea if you don't feel confident or informed enough to make the choices necessary.. The other alternative is to master it yourself.....as my tracks will show I need to go back and re visit some of my old projects and remaster or remix them, so I'm not there yet either. It really is an art and much different than mixing a song for mastering. In my opinion Ozone 7 Advanced is one of those programs that is an entirely justified purchase if you plan to master your own material since it offers a collection of tools and workflow that simply makes the process easier and results in a great end product. The first condition to mixing or mastering is a good listening environment. Your judgement can be wrong if what you hear isn't really accurate. Izotope has come down on the price of the advanced version making this purchase more tempting to the average home studio user. It still isn't inexpensive, yet when compared to paying a mastering engineer for projects it starts to look much less expensive. There is a learning curve as with anything, but once you get past that stage it gets much easier. Buying the basic version is one way to eventually "step up" to the advanced version especially since Izotope offers periodic sales on upgrade paths to existing users. The advanced version comes with additional plug-ins you can use on individual tracks.I loaded up the compressor, limiter and eq in my vst bin on several tracks and ran them through the paces. I am very impressed with the quality. There are vintage and modern feel settings. These plug ins are well designed. The compressor and limiter can be set to deal well with anything from light control to a loud hard hitting mix. A proper adjustment and these become transparent. The eq was equally impressive. I didn't hear any artifacts from the filters . These alone bring the value of the program up significantly. One of the strengths of Ozone has always been the friendly GUI. Version 7 is no exception here.The screen size can be expanded to full screen. There are a good many user presets included to get you started. I put Ozone 7 in my master channel, but it can be ran stand alone. It is usually suggested that Ozone works best with a finished stereo track mix bounced to another project and mastered individually from the main mix. I have done it both ways with no difficulty, the main consideration being how powerful your computer is and how well the file dithers. Under the hood there is a multiband compressor, EQ, limiter, exciter and tape emulation. In addition there is a post EQ. One of the big changes to version 7 is the ability to add your own plug-ins into the chain. In addition you can move all of these plug-ins around in the order that best suits you. In past versions it was never possible to add third party plug ins. Another great feature is the ability to hear the mix in real time as it would sound in mp3 or AAC formats at all of the most popular bit rates.. Have you ever made a mix and after exporting it to an Mp3 the mix doesn't sound the same? This feature allows you to hear it as it will sound when exported.You can make adjustments in real time to offset the deficiencies of compression formats. From my experience the differences aren't usually huge, but there are differences especially at the lower bit rates. In Ozone 7 it isn't as much about the type of plug ins as it is the GUI and the quality of each element. The multiband compressor offers many options in terms of how you want to treat your program material. You can finely hone each frequency to the best amount of compression. The EQ is made with well programmed nodes and filters so that there are no bad harmonics allowing you to sculpt the sound to exactly the right place in the mix with nothing extra. The EQ is a "dynamic" EQ which has the characteristics of both a compressor and EQ. In each case there are many choices. The vintage tape section adds all of the personality of a mix made with real tape. In every way Ozone can replicate the best hardware in the most expensive high end studios. The presets can get you started. Sometimes a preset is all you need. Another feature is insight. Insight is a visual representation of your music in several detailed formats. You can tell where all frequencies are and this helps to pinpoint the best place to make necessary adjustments. This is very helpful to see exactly where all sound is located. Here's a link to the site for more info.- https://www.izotope.com/en/products/mixing-mastering/ozone/
  3. From the album Audio stuff

    Here is a handy and simple pictorial about a way to approach the use of limiters.
  4. I seem to be having trouble bringing up the volume for mp3 files after mastering it from the daw. It sounds loud enough on wav but when i export it to mp3 it sounds to low. I checked around to see how to master mp3 and it does bring up the levels but not enough with out distorting or losing it's clearness. I was thinking maybe i can get a short sound clip that was mastered for mp3 that i can drop into my daw and compare it with the song I'm trying to master? If anyone would like to help me out with a clip that has the right levels for mp3 that would be great or if anyone else has a better idea I'm open.
  5. I actually started out behind a mixing desk then moved on to guitar. In my teens I was a broadcast engineer. Radio call in shows, live sports and music programs. Back then we called folks like me "DJ's" I did spend time in front of the mic news, weather and music fortunately no singing. And I'm a graduate of the now defunct Detroit Recording Institute where I studied under the masters of mowtown Musicians often wonder why something sounds so different live, recorded or broadcast. It's important Understanding what happens along the way allows you to make decisions early on in the recording stage and help to preserve the audio integrity while coming back to earth about all those fancy gizmos recording, dsp and vsti marketers want to push on us. Lets start with the end product usage. Personal and Live Performance Listening When one listens to music at fairly to very loud levels the ear shuts down a little. Just like our pupils dilate when exposed to bright light. Compression sets in and we don't hear things as clearly as we would at a moderate level. All the efforts for Dynamic range and headroom are lost because our ears can't take it all in. Your sound system may surpass the threshold of pain without distorting but it does your listening experience no good for having this "feature" There are no standards for live performance and the soundman is usually more concerned with feedback rejection and what the band can hear then dynamic range. Mass distribution format. There are several standards for mastering audio and some you will have no control over however knowing what others are doing with your song can make your hard decisions easier or at least more bearable. Your song is not going to sound the same way it did before you mastered it. Radio Television has way too many standards to count. As each network can and does have it's own standard for the treatment of audio. Take PBS for example (scroll down to section 3) The Web [Disclaimer] I do work for a software company that makes Flash "me to" products for authoring to swf and flv (flash format) I've been there for close to ten years now and amongst my other responsibilities I'm the goto guy for all things audio.[/Disclamer] SWF/FLV format depending on the variety of convertors has options for mp3, wav, acc and aiff. While you can import audio and use raw uncompressed It can choke the ram on macs and or result in choppy playback when streamed. Flash has built in compression at the optimum recommended compression level in flash which is 16 bit, 44,100 128 bits per second. It's fine for mac users (video / hardware is the big issue with mac users and flash not audio. Now I'm sure some of you are saying I own an ipad/ipod so what... Well the truth of the matter is in regards to internet access ios (ipad/iphone/ipod) actually have only a very small niche in the market One thing to caution about in regards to .mp3 format and flash. Flash does not accept variable bit rates If you import an mp3 and do not recompress internally it has to be a fixed bit rate. As well if you are using a service that converts files to a web friendly format (youtube) The use the same standards of compression for flv as they do for alternative mediums. The questions become who's manning the compression levels what type (codec) and what levels are they adjusting to for the compression) If you force a file that you think sounds great on your computer with lots of headroom 24bit encoding and massive bit rates like 256 kbs the big file cruncher in the sky is going to get you. Your oh so pretty sounds will experience clipping distortion loss of high end and generally a very muffled sound is going to come out on the other end. So remember it's called mix{b]Down for a reason. We love headroom. Headroom adds brilliance to the sound. Gives tone a certain level of clarity, being in the moment the sound seems somehow more alive for lack of a better word "Presence" All that headroom goes to waste if the compressor on the server chops it off or adds hard limiting. This may not seem like a small sacrifice deal for the average folk, jazz, blues, pop or classical player. But it brings grown men to tears in the metal, trance, dubstep and more aggressive hiphop crowds. Hosted services have to pay for comm servers (the software variety and the hardware as well incl maintenance) and bandwidth. It's no surprise that youtube was losing millions before the acquisition by google. <Sidetrack> just skip this part For awhile the company I worked for was in development of our own comm server software. It was like skype and youtube and shoutcast and webinar and other things combined. Great server software something a mega media company would love that never saw fruition. SWiSH Radio was the public face of our server hosted software. It allowed individuals or organizations to manage and host in a web friendly format (even iphone) a radio station. While in public beta our users loved it. Small town radio stations from around the world would broadcast from swishradio take the feed and run it thru the radio station system rather then program radio broadcasts manually. The bandwidth costs killed us. Remember we were in beta testing and as such we needed volunteers. You can't charge volunteers to test a product. The cost of bandwidth was insane so we had to abandon the product before we could do a full launch. </Sidetrack> So bandwidth costs hosting companies money. Especially when they are large(file size) and heavily consumed products such as audio and video. In order to reduce the cost of bandwidth the file size has to be reduced. A reduction in file size means a reduction in quality. Usually that means 22,500 16 bit 32kps on the small side to 44.1K 16bit 128 on the large size. If you don't want the great auto audio compressor in the sky to totally destroy your masterpiece as it enters the bit chopper you may want to think about trimming the headroom a bit and applying some more audio compression and file compression before you upload. Conclusion: As many of these mediums will force your audio to a much lower standard in regards to quality (compression/dynamic range) It's best to work to an optimal standard at the mastering stage so the integrity of the work is maintained rather then bit crushed by outside forces. Mastering Loudness wars are killing music don't be sucked in http://www.npr.org/2...ic-sounds-worse Television, Movie, Record producers and Record labels all recognize the value of quality mastering. While it's easy to ignore this part of the process as the writing, recording, editing and mixdown can drain the life out of a musician/producer to the extent they don't want to go further. If you consider yourself a professional you owe it to yourself and your song to have the mix mastered by someone as dedicated to their field as you are yours. The professional master engineer sits in a room filled with speakers and amplifiers of which he monitors to insure that no unwanted transient sounds emerge that may have been missed with a pair of near field monitors. He is there to insure that regardless of the room (headphones, car, bedroom, production room, living room. Regardless of the speaker system. Regardless of the amplification process. The sound has a consistent and even response it is also dithered down into a standard release format that can survive the brute force compression used by everywhere above in this article. That is a very very tall order. Along the way they try to bring the life of the performance back into the mix that may have been diluted by mixdown reduce the dynamic range while trying to preserve some headroom. It's done with an arsenal of tools including multi-band parametric eq compression. They don't use garage band or logic or pro-tools for this stage. They use broadcast specific software such as sequoia. Getting good at mastering takes a lot of time and education not to mention mastering specific tools. And now for a little entertainment Now for those of us who don't understand currency 300 pounds equates to 470 dollars US which is dirt cheap for mastering in the states. For those who wish to take on the responsibility of mastering for themselves. Don't start with your own material. Educate yourself first. Buy a song on amazon or itunes or where ever that has the highest bit rate possible. Something that you can compare with a video of the song on youtube http://pcworld.about...2001id64123.htm Most yt audio settings for video are 16 bit, 22,500 and 64 kbps. Roughly FM Radio If it's a professionally produced youtube video the sound quality may seem higher then simply using an mp3 conversion tool based on the way it is compressed before sorenson gets a hold of it. Many daws have mastering compressor some even with multi band compression.but not all mastering effects are equal. While ableton live may sound great in the mixdown side of things the automatic dithering for mastering is quite horrendous. I've worked with a lot of outboard gear and software thru the years. Samplitude Pro has the best mastering suite in the daw industry mostly because it's borrowed from Sequoia which is becoming an industry standard for broadcast audio mastering. I know it's expensive and several vst manufacturers do produce mastering suite effects of high, Your goal in mastering is to preserve transience response so that soft is quiet, medium is medium and loud is well you know loud and that it survives the dithering process. It's very tricky business for classical music which generally has the widest dynamic range (soft to loud). When you boost the quiet end soft sounds can begin to sound aliased as well you are raising the floor which is where all the artifact dust (distortion) collect. Try to put a noise gate on it and you'll get a very choppy signal if it's used to extremes.. Then you have to deal with resonant frequencies. Near field monitor speakers are allegedly flat. Home stereo, surround systems, earbuds and car audio systems are no where near flat in regards to frequency response. They all have sweet spots. Something that fit perfectly in the mix while listening to it with reference speakers will boost or cut depending on the manufacturer. Much of mastering is dictated to where your music will be played. While you won't be able to master in a club filled with people that is less your responsibility then the DJ or live engineer when you are actually playing there. Oddly people don't use their home entertainment systems to listen to music. They are more interested in video and games. Most people listen on their computers as background music during other activities. On their mp. players (ipods and the like) or in their car. Detroit is considered the birthplace of EDM (electronic dance music) We have huge festivals every year. I met up with an upstart mastering engineer who is making a very nice niche in edm.DJ's love his remix work. I was curious as to what he did differently. He did all his mastering in his car. With an adequate car sound system and no kicker. Oddly at moderate levels. He explained it to me this way. He lives in a small apartment with thin walls and sensitive neighbors. All the sound insulation in the world won't keep the sound from leaking even a little. To have a sub in that environment is well dumb because it's just not a large enough room for the bass to move around. His car is the perfect place to do his mastering. In cars is the most popular place to listen to edm. EDM is not hiphop. They don't believe in sacrificing all other parts for the bass. EDM has a lot of instrumentation in it. 50 to 60 different instruments on a single edm track is not unheard of. Though 16 to 32 is the norm. They all require a certain level of headroom to survive too much bass would muffle the other instruments. He uses izotope ozone as his swiss army knife for a mastering tool. He doesn't need the other offerings the world has (uad, etc, etc) Because he's highly specialized and knows his market well. There is no point in playing with distractions that could be detraction from the final sound. Of which so long as he stays in his niche market is fine. If he were to move into other fields country, rock, jazz etc then it might be a good idea to investigate his other options. Mike
  6. Hi everyone! My name is Francesco, I work full time as music composer of soundtracks and sound designer for cinema, tv and video games. I'd like to receive feedback and comments to my music works, you can listen to them here on my bandcamp website: http://francescodandrea.bandcamp.com/ Critiques, nice words and bad ones welcome Thank you! Francesco
  7. Hi everyone! Here's my latest song. I played every instrument, did the singing, mixed and mastered it. It'd be great to hear what you think and if you think it's done on a professional level. http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_13999394 thanks
  8. Hello my name is Derrick and I am an audio post production engineer/mastering engineer from Sonik Soundworks Mastering. Glad to be here!
  9. I found this interesting app for ear training... http://quiztones.net/#home Identify frequencies by pure tone, and EQ changes in program material. Works well for free in FireFox, and I think it's downloadable for the iPhone as well.
  10. Hey everyone! I just found this site, so thought I'd drop in and see if I could meet a few like-minded people! I write and arrange songs in various genres, play several instruments, offer full production out of my studio here in Toronto, and am always looking to work with new people! Drop me a line and say hello! Cheers! Jon Mychal www.thesonicspa.com
  11. T-RackS 3 Deluxe is the flagship mastering product from IK Multimedia. Billed as a considerable improvement on the previous version of T-RackS, T-RackS 3 claims improved metering, plus upgraded modules from T-RackS 2, and offers 5 new high-end signal processing modules. So What exactly does the deluxe version offer, and is it a worthwhile investment for your hard earned money when compared with the T-RackS 3 Standard Edition? Read the review of T-RackS 3 Deluxe Edition