Carnival

Songwriting Collaboration For Lyricists

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Hey, I'm wondering if anybody would be interested in a colloboration? I've wrote many lyrics but I do not compose music. I wanted to know is there anybody who would be willing to compose some music to these lyrics? Also if anybody needs a lyricist for their music I would love to do that! If you're interested please PM me! Thanks :)

Edited by Lee93

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I'm a newbie here and would like to put my name in the hat for colabs. If anyone wants to see my style of writing I'll be posting in the lyric section. Just to add to the conversation previously, I think all songs read by a publisher should be grammatically correct. These lads are sharp enough to know that the phrase "Going to" is going to be sung "gonna" by the artist they have in mind to sing it.

Proper grammar shows that you care in your writing enough to make it correct and will enhance a publicist to read on.

Just my two cents worth.

Cheers

Ken

Edited by KenP

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I'll give it some thought Norm. But for every composer, there seems to be about 40 lyricists. That is one of the reasons I advocate good spelling and grammar in lyric writers. There is no excuse for bad spelling, sloppy writing. I didn't have the benefit of a decent education, having been kicked out of high school at 15 (mainly for non attendance!) but I try to make sure my spelling is right. If I want to get crit for a lyric, I make sure it's right! (Not too often you've probably noticed!) We are all guilty of making the odd spelling error when typing generaly, as in these replies! But for someone who wants to be taken seriously as a writer, I think the first requirement is to get it right! I know you feel the same, as do a few others here, but there are too many, particularly the younger set, who think it's acceptable! The worst thing is, even when pulled up about their spelling, grammar and punctuation, some still think they can get away with it and still have dreams of being a pro lyricist! When I start to read a lyric, I get distracted by sloppyness. It detracts from the point of the lyric.

[/rant]

Who disagrees with me?

This comment disappoints me and makes me to stop writing lyrics.

Edited by Alyricman
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When I write lyrics, I have the entire song (most times) in my head and keep 'perfecting' the lyrics by singing and playing all instruments in my head (I am awesome in my own mind - ha ha ha). In my head, I can hear the finished product. Would a musician/band be insulted if I asked them to play the way I hear it in my mind?

Just curious.

I have had people play my stuff. My nephew did a couple of my songs on youtube and a couple of people have done my stuff at open mike nights.

But so far, no royalties. :rolleyes:

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I simply like to write music to other peoples lyrics. My problem is getting started.

When someone writes song lyrics they generally have a melody in mind (if not then it is really a poem of some sort, is it not?)

If I could find someone that has written a song and give me the melody they used I can add the percussion, guitars, keyboards, strings, etc in my home studio. The song would be sent back and forth as it was being done for ideas, input, etc.

Not looking to make a living or get rich of of this. I just enjoy working in my studio.

The problem is...I SUCK at writing lyrics...BIG TIME...and I know it.

But how do you go about finding someone that simply would like to hear their lyrics and melody played with real instruments?

That is where I am looking.

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hi,

i guess we can work that out. I write lyrics and all i wanted to do now is to hear my lyrics be played with instruments. I'm not sure though if we can match our wants in the type of music.

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I posted my lyrics on a few sites and managed to get a few interested musicians/songwriters that said the lyrics were cool and sounded really keen. Only problem was, months down the line, I never heard from them again. Don't know what to make of it. Either the lyrics weren't musically that good, they were that good that they stole them LOL, or did they just struggle to come up with anything and thought "i'll just forget about them". Kind of stopped me from writing new stuff and I got a bit disheartened. What's the point in writing lyrics if they are not "put to music"? Still hoping tho!!!

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Ah, you have arrived. Such is the way. Don't stop because you get discouraged tho', I think that is a given in this endeavor. You know whats worse than someone not following through? Someone completely destroying your lyric, I've not had anyone on Songstuff do it, but on another board I submitted a lyric that this guy just trashed with really poor guitar work and rotten, terrible, awful, obnoxious singing. I wish he would have not delivered on his promise and just let it drop. I never went back to the site again. Sounds like I'm pushing Songstuff, but honestly, that has just never happened to me here and I've had a few colabs over the past few years.

Keep it coming....

MP

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Collaborating should be a great experience. It should make you stretch yourself, be more open to changes and criticism. You have to have the right mind going in as well as being totally honest and upfront with the other person.

If your mind is set in stone on what you want your music or lyrics to be, you'll follow a rocky path in my experience. But tell the other person this. Don't let them spend the hours creating something that makes you feel sick (see genre note below).

With an open mind for both parties, appreciate that what each brings can evolve into something very different by blending.

Some of us are blessed with hearing the musical composition. Some of us with the words and melody. Break down the walls and help each other understand why a 10 meter line won't fit into a 6 beat bar (for example). I think people also get stuck in a genre - push yourself out of your comfort zone. It's the perfect opportunity to do so and discover your strengths and weaknesses and to then improve on them.

If you're not sure about someone, if your gut is saying take it slow, try and ask around about them - check them out. It's a tricky thing this trust over the net.

And as with anything in life, you'll get the wrong end of the stick from time to time. So what are you waiting for? Get out there and get collaborating :)

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I've had several collabs with lyric writers. (here) It can be quite rewarding to put someones lyrics to music but as a musician, the biggest drawback I see, is most lyric writers are aiming to hear their songs played on the radio! In my case, I don't think that's ever gonna happen. It's also not gonna happen for lots of other composers. The difference between a lyric and the music, is the lyric doesn't need to be performed! I'm not the best musician in the world, and I don't have the best equipment or skill for recording, so the songs I have collaborated on will never be commercially accaptable. If I ever see that a lyricist wants some music written, I am instantly put off by the words 'Radio' and 'Commercial'. I'm just never gonna get there! I have music and melodies that I can't write lyrics for, but they'll stay with me for now. I also read some lyrics that I can 'hear', but again, I am nervous about offering help because of the above mentioned reason. I guess it comes down to a reality check.We would all like to have commercial succes! I don't imagine there is one lyric writer here that wouldn't love to team up with the perfect composer to form the next Taupin - John song writing partnership! (And I would encourage that from everybody here!) But I would suggest from potential lyrical collaborators to set their sights on getting a song written as a song, and not as a commercial proposition! If it's a good song, then who knows what might happen?

:) Anybody else had any luck with collaborations?

Hi Steve, I am a lyricist that has over the years, worked with musicians, composers and producers of varying levels of skill. I find that the joy is in the blending of the lyrics and music to form a song. The way that I work is that when a good song comes from a collaboration, regardless of the quality of music or guide vocal, It is still a good song. I am lucky enough to have several studios that I can use, so all I have to do is lay the track using session musicians, and find a singer that can do the song justice. I then put the song in the hands of a runner who is very good at placing songs with known artists. When writing or collaborating, I don't think about what will happen with the song because I am too involved in getting the song right. I have written some of my best songs with inexperienced musicians, and have found that many excellent musicians that I use in the studio, cannot compose a song. You don't have to be a great technician to be a great songwriter.

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Hi Steve, I am a lyricist that has over the years, worked with musicians, composers and producers of varying levels of skill. I find that the joy is in the blending of the lyrics and music to form a song. The way that I work is that when a good song comes from a collaboration, regardless of the quality of music or guide vocal, It is still a good song. I am lucky enough to have several studios that I can use, so all I have to do is lay the track using session musicians, and find a singer that can do the song justice. I then put the song in the hands of a runner who is very good at placing songs with known artists. When writing or collaborating, I don't think about what will happen with the song because I am too involved in getting the song right. I have written some of my best songs with inexperienced musicians, and have found that many excellent musicians that I use in the studio, cannot compose a song. You don't have to be a great technician to be a great songwriter.

That is such a hopeful message! Im a beginner songwriter and my guitar playing is average, my guide vocal is doo doo, and my lyric-writing...well, I think you know where that's going.

But I am truly blessed to have met a collaborator/lyricist almost a year ago, who appreciates what I can and cannot do and trusts me with his work. He knows that I can't sing but he also knows that he can't sing any better than I can(Just kidding, haha)! No but seriously, the first song we completed(pop/country) immediately got signed to a publisher in Nashville and I know for a fact that I couldn't have done it without him!

Now, Im looking to explore Dance and R&B as well so Im on the search for other lyricists to collaborate with.

Ken :thumbsup2:

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I've had several collabs with lyric writers. (here) It can be quite rewarding to put someones lyrics to music but as a musician, the biggest drawback I see, is most lyric writers are aiming to hear their songs played on the radio! In my case, I don't think that's ever gonna happen. It's also not gonna happen for lots of other composers. The difference between a lyric and the music, is the lyric doesn't need to be performed! I'm not the best musician in the world, and I don't have the best equipment or skill for recording, so the songs I have collaborated on will never be commercially accaptable. If I ever see that a lyricist wants some music written, I am instantly put off by the words 'Radio' and 'Commercial'. I'm just never gonna get there! I have music and melodies that I can't write lyrics for, but they'll stay with me for now. I also read some lyrics that I can 'hear', but again, I am nervous about offering help because of the above mentioned reason. I guess it comes down to a reality check.We would all like to have commercial succes! I don't imagine there is one lyric writer here that wouldn't love to team up with the perfect composer to form the next Taupin - John song writing partnership! (And I would encourage that from everybody here!) But I would suggest from potential lyrical collaborators to set their sights on getting a song written as a song, and not as a commercial proposition! If it's a good song, then who knows what might happen?

:) Anybody else had any luck with collaborations?

I agree that the focus should be on the song itself. However, I have to disagree with you on the subject of visualising or dreaming of hearing it on the radio. Dreams are what keep talented people going in a hard hearted and fickle market. Without dreams, people give up.

What makes a song is the Lyric and Melody. If the chords are there and the lyric is good, the rest can follow.

I am a lyricist who doesn't write music, and yet have had my share of success. If you have a good song through collaboration where the lyric and vocal melody are in place, even though it is not a great recording, then I would suggest that your next move should be to find yourself a producer who likes the basic song. Producers are always in contact with many up and coming and known artists who are dying to get their hands on a good song. If the producer likes the song then he will produce it and find the right singer for it. That same producer will have record company contacts.

Don't be put off by inexperience. Many years ago, a friend showed me some lyrics, "Bend me shake me", "Hi Ho silver lining" and another titled "Brandy". The first two became big hits in the UK in the 1960s, and "Brandy" went on to become "Mandy" which was a big hit for Barry Manilow.

Every lyricist, musician and performer has a dream. Unfortunately for many, that dream fades and they give up.

Keep your dreams alive, but remember, it takes fearless action to make a dream come true..

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I enjoyed this thread. Sad when it was over. :(

I don't really have a lot of experience in this area, but to add to the discussion, it would seem communication is key. I'm working on adding music to another members lyric now, and I told him a long time ago that I stay pretty busy and it would take months to hear back. Occasionally I pm to let him know I haven't forgotten. And the most important part. He has been informed of my skill level and the purpose of the endeavor for me.

Collaboration shouldn't be so .... well selfish, for lack of a better word. For me, I am collaborating as an exercise. Nothing more than a chance for me to try my hand at a set of lyrics that I didn't already have something mapped out for in my head. There will be no commercial gain from either of us. I expect there will be some constructive criticism, but even if he hates what I did, I can't imagine he would blast me like Park does above. I expect rather he would be interested to hear my take and be flattered I thought enough of his lyrics to spend that much time with them. As I am he let me toy with them. Even if the result is poor, the effort alone should be an honor to the lyricist. And vice verse as well depending on who went first I guess. These things don't typically come easy.

I guess the whole point is collaboration, especially for first time collaborators, should really be more of skill building endeavor than a commercial opportunity or competition with each other. Now if your skills are polished and it's time you showed the world what you can do, I guess that's a different story, but how many of us really fall into that category? That's the whole point of communication being key. Everyone should be brutally honest about what to expect. Not generate hype or sell yourself, but set realistic goals and move forward.

Even if you are very good, I still believe there would be benefit to working with someone well below your skill level. The average music purchaser is not an accomplished musician. A rookie likely has a very good idea of what would sell since most consumers have no idea what we do as musicians. They just like the sound. Working with someone closer to the level of your consumer may show your music is too complicated or too boring or who knows.

Sorry for the long rant. I just don't want people to read through and think collaborating is for those that have mastered their skill. There is plenty of room for people to hook up just to practice their respective talents.

Edited by Joe51
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Hello all!

I've had a couple songs of mine "published" and even put on youtube with an album to be released soon! it's a dream come true, but I still wish to have a career with possible pay and benefits. I want to start writing for more people and expand my horizons. Any tips? I'm very creative and my style reflects that. I have a distaste for close-toes songs that don't get a little room to breathe. I write powerfully and I'm proud of that. Anyway, any advice would be nice. thank you!

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I DONT AGREE ABOUT LYRICS HVING TO HAVE GOOD GRAMMAR AND CORRECT SPELLING LYRIICS ARE FAR MORE COMPLICATED THAN THAT IT NOT JUST ABOUT WHAT YOU ARE SAYING IT ABOUT HOW YOU PRONOUNCE WHAT YOU ARE SAYING AND IT ABOUT THE NUMBER OF DIFFERENT WAYS YOU CAN PRONOUNCE THEM TO DO THAT PROPERLY YOU HAVE GOT TO TAKE A WORD AND THEN MORPH IT THROUGH ALL ITS VAREINTS EXAMPLE CANDY CANDAY CANDIE CANDE CANJ CANDE TO NAME BUT A FEW BEING A LYRICIST HAS A LOT IN COMMON WITH BEING A SPEACH THERAPIST PUPIL THE PUPIL WILL UNDERSTAND LYRICS BUT THE TEACHER NEVER WILL

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Hey guys

What a great topic - I am reading this with interest!

I have only recently begun writing lyrics and it happened accidentally when I offered to help a friend with his lyrics but ended up writing them too!

if you had told me this time last year that I would be writing lyrics now I probably wouldn't have believed you.

In the words of Martha and The Muffins 'My job is very boring, I'm an office clerk' this is basically my life!!! so whenever my friend publishes one of his songs on Youtube it is great fun and also rewarding for me, just knowing that I have played my small part in the production of each song.

Best wishes to you all in your ventures and collaborations!

Jan

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Guess I should put this out here. I write lyrics for fun. IF somehow the opportunity to make any money off of it came my way I would not turn it down.

I have no musical abilities of my own. Don't play anything, can't sing (so that anyone would want to listen). So the only way my lyrics are heard is if someone else comes up with music and records the song.

That said, I like to collaborate with musicians for fun. If anyone see a lyric of mine that they'd like to work with, let me know. Simple musical arrangement, or something more complicated, either works for me. I'm pretty easy to work with and understand that the singer/arranger may need to tweak things to get it "sing" properly.

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Collaberation... great subject... it is really just finding someone willing to do it, someone who likes your lyrics or music... I love to write lyrics to music.. haven't done that in a while, but, have done it... I am looking for someone (as most lyricists are) to be a tunesmith on a couple of my songs... when someone takes my lyrics to add music and melody, I understand that they may have to change the lyrics to fit what they do... hopefully keeps the hook and the meaning... but also, it might be good to have a couple of people add lyrics to your music, each will have their own interpretation of what feeling the music has...

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I can't get no satisfaction worked well despite the double negative! Mangled grammar doesn't work though. I would be interested in having music put to lyrics but don't know where to start. Any suggestions of sites I could use?

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Roxthye- I def agree what you are saying.. its about collaborate

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All very good and informative posts...  things to consider.  90% of songs are written by more than one person, even in the publishing companies, and it is true that two heads are better than one, sometimes 3 or 4 will work together.

There are approx 10 million songwriters in North America, about 3.5 million are musicians, the rest are a combination of lyricists and songwriters that do lyrics and melody but can't play an instrument..

Respect is the biggest factor in ANY relationship, including collaboration..  understand that you may go through a few contacts before finding that person you communicate well with, that has the creative abilities you are looking for..   and maybe one can be too picky and miss out on something... it doesn't hurt to have 3 or 4 people either write lyrics to your music, or to write music to your lyrics... 

Good luck to all...  me, I used to write the melodies, but now mostly lyrics.. I am too weak on the music side, but stronger on the lyrics side...  I have found it fun to write lyrics to music, and have enjoyed the responses to those writings..  

Edited by Ed Martin

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As some of my work is stymied at present (I write both music & lyrics), I will consider contributing some music to lyrics.

 

I've looked through the lyrics area. I have approached one person but that proved unproductive.

 

I'll keep checking.

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Thanks for the really useful post.

I am quite new to lyric writing and am finding it a really rewarding process. But I also believe that ....'Nothing will teach you to write lyrics like music will'. But I have not been holding out much hope of collaboration as I think it will be hard to find someone who is able to take the time with someone that is just trying to learn how to be better and I imagine that those songwriters out there that are just starting are like me, are not brave enough to post for a collaboration.

This post is encouraging. I think I will stick with just posting lyrics for critique for now and in a years time if I think I have anything reasonable I might try posting for collaboration.

thanks for sharing your experience

Lindsey

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I generally hear a tune as I write the words. As Joe mentioned, sometimes I can hear a tune as I read a lyric too. Trouble is, I might forget the tune! Recording as I go won't work for me because I can't sing in tune, so the recording won't be notepaper for me. I don't currently have a collaboration partner, but I am open to the idea, certainly. 

 

I know people don't have to sit down and write together to be successful (as in getting a song written, not as in making money from it) but I can't think of a better way than to play together. Maybe I'll learn if anyone ever offers?

 

Always willing...

 

Kel

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Hi, I'm new to this site, joined a few days ago. 

 

I write lyrics mainly with country music in mind, however I guess that is from my perspective, someone else reading the same words may hear something entirely different than what I had imagined.   

 

I am looking to collaborate with someone interested in writing the music for my lyrics. I have a few postings on Lyric Critique and Lyric critique (members).   

 

Can I post lyrics to both of the above critiques as well to songwriters looking for lyrics for collaboration, with one post?  If so, how? 

 

I appreciate any info.   

 

thanks

 

JD Harris

Edited by JDHarris
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Good post.

 

I had had a successful career as a lyricist until 2000 when I walked away from the music business in order to pursue other interests that I had neglected over the years. Mainly the wife.

 

When I ventured back after a 10 year break, I felt like a novice. I asked myself "how do I reconnect" with musicians after such a long absence I Put my resume on LinkedIn and it wasn't long before musicians began to contact me. I also joined a couple of musician forums, one being songstuff. When finding other musicians who would like to work with you, don't neglect the busness side of things.

 

One thing I had learned the hard way many years ago was to have a split-sheet contract drawn up which each collaborator must sign. This in effect prevents problems arising in the future. You may be surprised to hear that when a song is successfully placed with a known artist, and money enters the equation, arguments over percentage ownership can often raise their ugly head.

 

Below is a split-sheet that I use although you can get other contracts elsewhere. You are welcome to copy and paste it and use it yourself.

 

 

 

Songwriter Collaboration & Split Agreement page 1 of 2

 

 

This agreement (“Agreementâ€) is made as of _________________ between the following Two individuals (collectively referred to as the “Writersâ€):

 

( “Writer 1†) Jillian Smith________________ _______________ ( “Lyricist" )

 

( “Writer 2†) John Smith________________________________ ( “composer†)

 

 

In consideration of the mutual undertakings described herein, the Writers agree as follows:

 

  1. Authorship & Ownership. Each of the Writers have, either independently or jointly contributed to the authorship of the original musical composition entitled

     

"Song titleâ€................................................................................. ( “Compositions†).

 

The Writers intend that all music and lyrics in the Composition shall be merged into a single joint work, the ownership and exploitation of which shall be governed by the terms of this Agreement. The Composition, including the copyright and all other rights in the Composition, shall be jointly owned by the Writers (who intend to treat each other as co-authors) and/or their music publishing designee's according to the following ownership shares:

 

 

Writer 1:___________%                                                     Writer 2:__________%

 

 

 

2. Copyright Registration. Each Writer shall have the right to register the copyright in the

Composition, provided that any Writer making such registration shall accurately specify the authorship

and ownership interests of the Writers in the registration application and shall mail a copy of such

registration application to the other Writer(s) at the same time or before the mailing of the registration

application to the Copyright Office.

 

 

 

3. Exploitation & Administration. The Writer’s rights in the Composition shall be administered worldwide by the Writers or their music publishing designees or assigns jointly, or by one of them pursuant to an agreement between the Writers or their music publishing designees or assigns. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, all negotiations relating to the licensing, publication, or other exploitation of the Composition shall be conducted as joint negotiations between the Writers. Each Writer shall keep the other Writer(s) fully informed as to the status and progress of such negotiations. No agreement relating to the exploitation of the Composition, whether exclusive or non-exclusive, shall be valid without the consent in writing of all of the Writers, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld. Each Writer shall receive a copy of any such contract, license, or other document. Each license or agreement for the exploitation of the Composition shall provide that the licensee or other third party account directly to each Writer for its share of any advances, fees, and royalties. If any of the Writers receive any royalties or other payments which should have been paid to any other Writer(s), the Writer receiving such royalties or other payments shall pay the appropriate share of such royalties or other payments to the Writer(s) entitled to receive such sums within ten (10) days of receipt accompanied by a statement stating the nature and source of the amount(s) received. Each Writer shall have the right to audit the books and records of the other Writer(s) with respect to any accounting rendered pursuant to this Agreement.

 

 

SIGNATURES Required Below

 

 

 

Writer 1: ____________________                                        Writer 2: _____________________

 

 

 

 

continued.......................                                                                                                page 2 of 2

 

 

 

4. Costs. Each individual Writer shall be responsible for their own costs related to the Composition:

(a) copyright registration fees; ( B)costs relating to the collection of royalties; © costs incurred in connection with the exploitation or protection of the Composition, including reasonable attorneys’ fees; and (d) fees charged by agents, such as The Harry Fox Agency, Inc., sub-publishers, or administrators. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no Writer may incur costs exceeding $100.00 without obtaining the other Writer(s)’ prior consent.

 

 

5. Term. This Agreement shall last for the full copyright term of the Composition.

 

 

6. Credit. In all contracts relating to the exploitation of the Composition, the Writers will use their best efforts to insure that each Writer shall receive credit as an author of the Composition in all media where credits are customarily given to songwriters.

 

7. Warranties. The Writers warrant that their contributions to the Composition are original and do not infringe upon the copyright or violate the rights of any third party. Each Writer indemnifies and holds harmless the other Writer(s) and their successors and assigns from and against any expenses (including reasonable attorneys’ fees), damages or losses (including any amounts paid in settlement, but only if the indemnifying party consents to the settlement in writing) incurred by the indemnified party by reason of the breach of the indemnifying party’s warranties.

 

 

8. Assignment. Each Writer may assign his/her ownership interest in the Composition and/or his/her right to receive income from the Composition to any person or entity; provided, however, that the assigning Writer shall not be released by that assignment from any of his/her obligations under this Agreement.

 

 

9. Applicable Law. In the event of any action, suit or proceeding by one Writer against the other Writer(s), the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs related to such action, suit or proceeding.

 

 

10. Miscellaneous. This Agreement is binding upon and inures to the benefit of the heirs, executors, administrators, representatives, and assigns of the Writers. This Agreement is the entire agreement between the Writers with respect to the Composition and may be amended only by a written instrument signed by all of the Writers. If any part of this Agreement shall be invalid or unenforceable, such invalidity or unenforceability shall not affect the balance of this Agreement. Nothing in this Agreement shall be deemed to create a partnership or joint venture between the Writers. The headings of the paragraphs of this Agreement are for convenience only and shall not be deemed to limit or in any way affect the scope, meaning or intent of this Agreement.

 

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,

The Writers execute this Agreement as of the date specified above.

 

 

Writer 1: Jillian Smith                                                Writer 2: John Smith

 

 

 

Signature: ______________                                   Signature:_______________

 

 

Address:                                                                   Address: 

Edited by Wordflower
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In terms of collaboration is it too much to ask a potential partner to simply lend their vocals to a song? Would the partner want more input towards the song? For example, if I had music and lyrics already written, but wanted a good vocalist, would the vocalist not feel a little cheated? It's hardly collaboration...or is it best to let the partner have song-writing input as well?

Personally, I have never paid a singer who has sung on any of my many tracks. What I do is return the favour in any way that I can. 

A singer may want some guitar or keyboard on a song of their own, or you may own a better microphone than the one that they have. You may be in a position to help them out by offering them some free studio time. They may be strugling with the lyric on a song and need your help to improve it. There are many ways to reciprocate the favour and basically you will be helping each other out. Everything is up for negotiation. I hope this helps.

Edited by Wordflower

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Thanks for the really useful post.

I am quite new to lyric writing and am finding it a really rewarding process. But I also believe that ....'Nothing will teach you to write lyrics like music will'. But I have not been holding out much hope of collaboration as I think it will be hard to find someone who is able to take the time with someone that is just trying to learn how to be better and I imagine that those songwriters out there that are just starting are like me, are not brave enough to post for a collaboration.

This post is encouraging. I think I will stick with just posting lyrics for critique for now and in a years time if I think I have anything reasonable I might try posting for collaboration.

thanks for sharing your experience

Lindsey

You are definitely on the right track Linsey. Action is what pays off in the long run. By posting your lyrics, eventually someone will like one of them enough to want to form the music and melody for it. If you also do that on other music forums, you will increase your chances of finding someone.. Lastly it is important to stay positive because perseverance always wins the day.

 

I wish you all the luck which you certainly deserve.

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Hey guys. My name is Nicolas and I'm from Germany. I've been writing lyrics and poems the past months and I guess I'm pretty talented. I need a partner, a composer/Music writer, no matter what age or gender, or location, who's in Rock-Pop music, but also capable for other genres. I don't want someone to offer me his work, so I'll buy it, 'cause that's *** in my opinion. I want a partner with whom I can collaborate with and make some real music. Don't waste your time thinking about everything but send me a mail to "slef_ioh@yahoo.com" if you're interested and let's start already, there no time to lose! Yours truly, Nico.

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"Oh, your a musician?  I write lyrics and I'm looking for a collaborator."

 

As a musician this is the sentence you dread hearing.  You nod and say "Oh, absolutely." but you're looking over their shoulder for an exit.  Why?

 

The quick answer is we have worked with other "lyricists" before and it didn't go well.  Either the lyricist is inflexible and count's any change as artistic blasphemy, refuses to "conform" to your Nazi rules, or has such god-awful structure that you don't know where to begin.  

 

Songs that other people enjoy have structures.  I didn't make up that rule, but it is true.  Music is a great deal of mathematics.  Syllables, beats, rhyme placements, patterns, forms, it  all matters much more than you some writers suspect.  Don't give a musician anything that does not fit a pattern of some type, they will quickly dismiss it.

 

Also, there is no test you must pass to call yourself a "lyricist".  Of course YOU are the next coming of Neil Young, but there are some people who just have no talent for it at all.  It does not stop them.  If you want to really hook a musician you must give them the lyrics and wait for them to call you.  If they do, they see something they think they can work with.  If they don't, they didn't.  No one is going to steal you bad song and no one is going to steal your lyrics.  

 

Keep in mind what a collaborator is.  It's NOT somebody who does the part you don't know how to do.  That's an employee.  It's not a 50/50 proposition.  It's a 100/100 proposition.  Convince a musician that you realize this and your path will be easier.  REALLY BELIEVE IT and your path will be smooth.

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