Jenn

I found a microphone!

4 posts in this topic

Ok so I've always wanted to try singing with a mic.. and I finally did it last night and had a complete ball (I was also completely plastered but that's besides the point).. anyway.. this is something I've always wanted to do and is a milestone for my musicianship ..

But please let me know any secret techniques or anything at all that can help me improve.. or if you just want to listen, thanks so much for listening :)

 

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Posted (edited)

Hey Jenn,

Youve got a nice singing voice.

I can only offer the following amature advice:

1. Relax your shoulders.

2. Be aware of breading in between phrases.

3. Don't drink and record.

4. I'm sure there is better advice online.

 

Happy hangover 

Edited by Leo

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practice every day. I try to, but rarely do. It really helps though. Taking the time to breath deeply before singing somehow helps me prepare if I intend to sing with projection.

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Sing with proper "mic technique."  Try to stay consistently within the mic's "sweet spot" for capturing sound - don't be too close or too far away, but adjust your distance depending on what your're sinigng and how loudly you're singing it.  Too close and/or too loud and you'll overload the mic's diaphragm.  Too far away and/or too soft, and you'll have to up the mic's gain and thereby add additional preamp noise to the vocal.

 

Singing into a mic for a live performance is not like singing into a mic for a recording - especially if you're still working out the vocal arrangement - i.e., what notes you want to sing, and how you want to sing them.  FWIW:

 

If you're recording while working out the vocal melodies and arrangement, I suggest you take it one line/phrase at a time.  Record it, then play it back.  Does it sound good?  Could singing different notes and/or singing those notes in a different way convey what you want to convey in a better way?  Try it.  Sing another take, and play it back.  Then, when you have a take for that line/phrase that sounds good and like you want it to sound, move on to the next line/phrase, unless you'll be adding one or more harmonies to the current line/phrase - do those next and get those to sound good too, then move on to another line/phrase.  In my opinion, the best way to work out a vocal arrangement, including harmonies, is to use such a piecemeal approach while recording.  It's also the most efficient way of identifying problems with the vocal recording as they happen.  And, don't tell me you can't really get into singing the song that way either.  If you can't get into singing every line/phrase the best way you can, then you're not singing the best you can for that song.  By trying to do large portions of a vocal track in one take, you won't as readily identify issues with the recording you're making, you won't think of as many different possibilities in terms of notes you can sing and you won't think of as many different ways to sing them here and there throughout the song.  You also won't be as able to address prosody issues and needed lyric tweaks as efficiently.  And, just as importantly, you won't be as apt to getting stuck in the counter-productive inertia of singing a melody in a certain way before you've worked out the best vocal arrangement for that song and that lyric.  Once you have every line/phrase sounding the best it can and sounding the way you want it to sound, you can practice singing the whole song as a cohesive whole.  Deconstructing an overall sing to address specific parts within it is harder to do and less likely to achieve desired results.  Just like you build the melodies and arrangements for musical instruments note-by-note, section-by-section, chord-by-chord, and/or progression-by progression, you should build the vocal arrangement line/phrase-by-line/phrase.  And then, when you get those lines/phrases to sound just like you want them to sound, if they're repeated elsewhere in the song, you can just copy and paste them them elsewhere and have it sound perfectly consistent.  Of course, you can always later revisit choices you made previously, and you should, and you will.  But, I think this is the best initial approach to working out vocals while recording.

 

Just my personal opinion based on my personal experience.  Your results may vary.  Void where prohibited.  Not recommended for young children.  But, DO attempt at home.

 

Edited by HoboSage
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