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How Do You Listen To Music?

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Rudi    571

Why do you think I bought the wine glasses? I am hoping to entice women into my house.

 

I bought a vacuum cleaner too. I'm sure it works. Its got a plug on it.

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Richard Tracey    252
On 19/04/2017 at 1:48 PM, starise said:

 

 I've been kicking this thought around too Steve. The manufacturers dish out some pretty bad stuff at lower price points. How many people buy those 5$ headphones at 5 Below? ( it's a chain here in the states). I dare say most parents are buying that for their kids and most college students are buying that because they are on a budget and the goal is to hear music in your ears..not much more thought goes into it. The manufacturers give us tone controls as a pacifier to make us feel like we have total control of the sound. Add to this the mp3 and what we have now is probably much worse than what we had 30 years ago. High quality can still be had, but at a price not many want to pay.

 

I compare it to my recent coffee roasting venture. I can go buy 1lb of no name coffee at the store for 4.00. For some people that's good enough. If you drink the really good stuff you'll know there is a huge difference. The cheap coffee was sourced from the lowest quality beans coming from the worst growing areas and the worst strains of coffee bushes.

I seek out green beans imported from the very best areas and the very best strains and hybrid plants, grown organically with no chemicals. I then roast it to the exact best flavor.

You simply won't get a better cup of coffee or espresso, especially if you buy it fresh roasted, grind the beans and make it right away. Yet how many coffee drinkers will go to a micro roaster and buy that coffee? As a percentage, very few will. The chain store price on average 4.99-7.99 for 1 lb. The micro roaster price on average 12.00-15.00 for 12 ounces or less. I don't see the venture being profitable long term unless I cater to a select group of buyer and advertise that I'm there. 

 

I see the music/audio industry as being very similar. The consumer has been conditioned to think of music as a thing they can get for cheap or free both in terms of the music and the gear used to play it. How can we add more value to music? The best we can do is make good music and mix it to sound the best it can sound on those cheap inexpensive consumer systems.

 

What the consumer thinks really doesn't change the heart of a true musician. They will still make music because they like to  make music. The rest of it could go to hell and they will be sitting somewhere with a guitar making music. So we have the problems, what are the answers? Someone had to work hard to make pretty much everything we enjoy possible, yet we seldom acknowledge it.

 

This is a good time for a plug for John and SS...if you can contribute please do so. It takes a lot of effort and time to keep a website alive. I can tell you as a website owner it isn't a cash cow, far from it.

 

This is true about making it sound as good as possible on cheap headphones. I have heard some recordings that sound terrible on everything you play it on and then I've heard some recordings that sound amazing, no matter what you play it on.

 

Tim I know you use Izotope Ozone and although I have the essentials one, I still think some of the mastering options are excellent, so there really is no reason for someone to produce a song and have it sound great on a budget.

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Rob Ash    477
20 hours ago, Rudi said:

 

I am making progress though. I have actual wine glasses now.

 

Rudi, why do you drink coffee from a wine glass???

 

 

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starise    368

OK you guys are going over my head.

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starise    368
16 hours ago, Richard Tracey said:

This is true about making it sound as good as possible on cheap headphones. I have heard some recordings that sound terrible on everything you play it on and then I've heard some recordings that sound amazing, no matter what you play it on.

 

Tim I know you use Izotope Ozone and although I have the essentials one, I still think some of the mastering options are excellent, so there really is no reason for someone to produce a song and have it sound great on a budget.

 

True Dat.

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Steve    86

I drink Tea.

 

 

 

And wine. :)

 

 

Lots of wine.

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Steve    86

I think ears and your brain adapt to what you subject them to!  I have a pair of high end Sennheiser heaphones that I use at home. But when I travel, I use a cheap pair of headphones. When I first put them on, the sound is pretty average to say the least! But after a few tracks, my brain has adapted to the sound and everything sounds great!

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Just1L    902
16 minutes ago, Steve said:

I think ears and your brain adapt to what you subject them to!  I have a pair of high end Sennheiser heaphones that I use at home. But when I travel, I use a cheap pair of headphones. When I first put them on, the sound is pretty average to say the least! But after a few tracks, my brain has adapted to the sound and everything sounds great!

 

I experience just that scenario every time I play my old records. On the first song it sounds pretty cruddy, but by song two I don't really notice.

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Rudi    571
24 minutes ago, Steve said:

I think ears and your brain adapt to what you subject them to!  I have a pair of high end Sennheiser heaphones that I use at home. But when I travel, I use a cheap pair of headphones. When I first put them on, the sound is pretty average to say the least! But after a few tracks, my brain has adapted to the sound and everything sounds great!

 

The same thing happens with cheap wine.

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starise    368
1 hour ago, Steve said:

I drink Tea.

 

 

 

And wine. :)

 

 

Lots of wine.

 

I wine, sometimes my wife wines too.

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Rob Ash    477
53 minutes ago, starise said:

I wine, sometimes my wife wines too.

 

Yes, but do either of you get really pissy about it.........?

 

I tend to prefer hops to grapes, mostly, but my gal and I break into a bottle of wine now and again. We have a high end grocery store here called "Fresh Market". Every time we go, there are at least two small batch wine producers hawking their wares and offering samples. Amazing how a sample or three can so readily entice me to buy one or two bottles of wine. Not sure how that correlates, but it does seem to occur on a regular basis.

 

 

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Rudi    571
15 hours ago, RobAsh15 said:

 

Amazing how a sample or three can so readily entice me to buy one or two bottles of wine. Not sure how that correlates, but it does seem to occur on a regular basis.

 

 

 

Its only what happens in pubs/bars. You nip in for a quick beer, but stay for several.

 

Tim's thread now entirely de-railed. Sorry man! :blush:

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TapperMike    370

Audio equipment.

It's still makes me wonder why or how Bang & Olufsen have survived.

 

I remember as a kid going around to various Hi Fi stores.  B&O had mediocre sound quality compared to everything in those shops.  Yet they sold surprisingly well.   It was all about looks.  The systems looked pretty   So it's not always about price point.  

 

My Brother in law spends a lot of money on home theater systems.  He has several to choose from for watching / listening pleasure.  Often I think he keeps them around to show off how many he has. I'll never understand why one room needs four distinctly different audio systems.  He's not in the music / television production industry, he's an investment consultant. like....... Bernie Madoff

 

 

 

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Rudi    571

My ears are not as good as they were. MP3 seems fine most of the time. I no longer have high end gear. Well.... I still have my 30 year old Mordaunt Short speakers, but they just serve as stands for the much smaller Denons.

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starise    368

Wha?? Wine? Hops? OK. 

 

FWIW I don't necessarily think we need high end gear to listen casually although for me just knowing I'm missing some of it bothers me. A high bitrate mp3, say 320kbps is a decent file.I wouldn't ever want to mix with an mp3. I've done it and the result is usually way less than what I wanted. a 128 mp3 compared to a 16/44.1 audio file or higher is a BIG difference. At 128mbps you start to get artifacts and they take out a lot of the bass information and some of the mids.You end up with tinnier sounding version of the original. Compare the two side by side and you'll notice a difference. Even with old ears :)

 

For casual background listening I probably wouldn't tell the difference because I'm not really listening intently to the music.

 

For mixing I want something I can trust like decent studio monitors in a space I, at the very least , understand the limitations of. Knowing the limitations has helped me a lot. Having said that I'm not Mr. Wonder Boy mixer. I'm still learning it. I recently listened to some mixes several years old. They sound dull and aren't mixed loud enough. I'm tempted to go back and remix at least a half dozen of my tracks,.

 

Rob, Rudi, I highly recommend Apothic Red.You can get it in the UK. I'm not really a  drinker per se, I seen it ruin two generations before me. I do like the occasional sip of a decent wine. I've tasted just about every decent beer known to man and I can't really develop any great appreciation for most of it.I might have one of the common ones here mass produced in the states on a hot day. The dark chocolate almost black gut rot they call beer. I don't care for it. When I seldom drink a beer  I'm more inclined toward a wheat or Pilsner. I don't care for anything too "hoppy" tasting. There's a local brewery right down the road from me, Victory Brewing .They make a beer they call " Hop Devil". If you like hops you would probably love that one.

 

 

 

 

 

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Rob Ash    477
11 hours ago, starise said:

I don't care for anything too "hoppy" tasting. There's a local brewery right down the road from me, Victory Brewing .They make a beer they call " Hop Devil". If you like hops you would probably love that one.

 

 

Cheap beer is cheap primarily because it includes a healthy amount of fermented rice in addition to a (relatively) small amount of hops, Tim. So when I say I like Hops, I can tell you that there are lots of beers... so called IPA's, or "Indian Pale Ales", many made by micro brewers, that are usually very "hoppy" tasting, and then there are simply good beers that do not skimp on the best ingredients. Many modern micro brews also include wheat, for taste, in the fermentation process. Samuel Adams is a noteworthy example of this.

 

What I actually LIKE are high end pilsners and lagers. My "goto's" are Stella Artois and Yuengling, My current (and for some time now) favorite is a beer called "Lucky Buddha", an Australian beer brewed by The Lucky Drink Company. They describe it as a "Euro Pale Lager".

 

The beer comes bottled in the snazziest twelve ounce bottle I've ever seen for a modern beer. It is sculpted into the shape of a squatting, laughing Buddha. The bottle is green and has no label. Only the shape and the cap identifies it. Although the bottle initially drew my attention, the beer itself keeps me coming back. Crisp, sharp, clean going in and with an equally clean finish, best when served at the bleeding edge of freezing. In other words, ice-ice cold.

 

I haven't been drunk in more than 11 years. I have only been drunk perhaps three of four times in my entire adult life. I identify the line between youth and adulthood as one defined by maturation and personal responsibility. I officially became a full adult at the age of 26, but I stopped drinking for effect long before that.

 

I have been described as a happy, cordial drunk. I am not at all proud to admit to these incidents, but I feel honesty is paramount, Tim. I am required, in that light, to own up to having been quite the drinker as a teen, but I learned quickly, in my very early twenties, that the cost in hangover effects was too high a price to pay for the sensation the previous night. I have always considered it to be a benefit that I have particularly devastating hangovers, most especially when I have been drunk on cheap wine. When asked once to describe the hangover I experienced on cheap wine, I described it thus:

 

"When I first woke up, I was fairly certain I was going to die. Then a half hour passed and I became fairly certain I would not die, but wished desperately that I could. This condition lasted a day and a half."

 

Now, of course, I find drunk people to be offensive, and am totally disinclined to engage in such behavior.

 

But a solidly good beer, or perhaps two, served super cold, almost invariably in combination with a great steak, is a treat.

 

And I love to treat myself.

 

 

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Rudi    571

Wine: apothic red. Ok I'll give it a whirl. I usually avoid Californian and French wines. Californian often tastes ok at first sip, then artificial aftertaste. French? They only export the stuff they dont want. I dont want it usually either.

 

I'll give you a report on the apothic red when I've tried it Tim. -Better be good! :angry2:

 

Ears. I would never choose to listen to mu0isc on studio speakers. That goes for headphones and NFMs. Too sterile. I had some Pioneer phones some 30 years ago that made everything sound great. I bought another pair when the originals wore out. I bet a sound engineer would know what it was made em sound like that.

 

Beer. Until I was 40 I hardly touched lager. I was into uk style real ales. Yes the hoppy stuff. That gig we played at the Wickham Beer Festival, and they gave us flagons of beer to take home at the end (they couldnt store it) was fantastic.

 

These days I do drink lager at home. Stella Artoise or Fosters usually. I also like to have Guiness on hand. Guiness Original if its out of  can.

Out and about in pubs, its still bitter beer usually.

 

No I have not been drunk for more years than I care to remember.

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starise    368

Hey guys I don't know how this happened talking about beer and wine. Maybe I brought it up? I see you appreciate the finer things in life like a good wine or a top of the line beer.

I've been slacking at the irish sessions, but when I was more regular I could have whatever I wanted for free. I tried most all of em. Most of the micro brews would overpower a meal. I like the drink to compliment rather than command the taste if I drink while eating. I guess if you drink the occasional beer as a meal in itself some of them could almost be a meal. There is a difference among the same beer names between beer here in the states and beer in the UK. For instance, Guinness tastes better in Ireland. I don't know what they do to the stuff they export, but it doesn't taste the same. Heinekin is the stuff the Germans don't want to drink so they ship it over here. I like Blue Moon Belgian style wheat ale. It is very close to a German Pilsner and goes really well with a meal, especially sea food. Plus, they give you a slice of orange on it. That's about as sophisticated as I get when it comes to beer. And even that is very occasional.

 

 

Please don't start on cigars I might puke just reading about that. The Apothic Red is an inexpensive all rounder. 

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Rudi    571
2 hours ago, starise said:

Guinness tastes better in Ireland. I don't know what they do to the stuff they export, but it doesn't taste the same.

 

Curious. I went to Ireland about 5 years ago and sampled the draft Guiness in Dublin. It was exactly the same as the stuff we buy in cans (Guiness Original).

 

So you are either drinking the so called 'draft Guiness' from cans or get some special export version.

2 hours ago, starise said:

they give you a slice of orange on it. That's about as sophisticated as I get when it comes to beer.

 

IMO, beer should not be sophisticated!

 

2 hours ago, starise said:

The Apothic Red is an inexpensive all rounder. 

 

Its £9 a bottle here. I dont usually spend that much on wine.

A nice Australian Shiraz, South African Pinotage or Spanish Rioja can usually be had for about £6.

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starise    368

You probably know way more than I do about wine. I pick up info here and there. Shiraz from Austrailia? Is that Barefoot wine? I don't know what a Pinotage is or a Spanish Rioja is. I know only one thing, if I like it, I know I like it. :D I'll look into those others.

 

I read some weird stuff online. Sometimes there's a grain of truth to it. I've had mild tinnitus for years. Recently I've noticed it ramping up and then leveling off again. Overall though it seems slightly worse. I've learned where it is and how to work around it, HOWEVER, I have noticed a difference. Others who have it claim it's getting worse and there's a theory out that the frequency of the earth is ramping up. More sensitive individuals can pick that up. Both level and frequency seem to be changing. In some places there is a detectable 30hz signal all the time. Not everyone can hear a tone that low. It is claimed in some places the freq. is at 40hz. The higher it gets, the more people can hear it. I seem to be getting a very high harmonic. Could be damaged pick ups in the ear drum too. Either that or I have a resonance happening. Harmonics of 40 would be 40>80>160>320>640>1280>2560>5120>10,240>20,480. This doesn't account for the resonance that can develop if we included multiple sources creating hybrid harmonics.

I believe we are picking up a lot of this spurious sound and it sometimes translates to tinnitus. Most radio transmission is in the upper frequencies, although submarines use ULF. We might be hearing a lower harmonic of those.

 

One woman claims to have found a way to use her tinnitus as a way to sense. I can tell when it changes. I haven't found a way to use that information. She somehow correlated it with people and feelings. I read that on the internet, so it has to be true :D I would like for her to show me how she did what she does.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by starise

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Rudi    571

curious...

 

This is purported to be the hearing range of people and animals.

Remarkable symmetry between Chinchillas & Horses. Who'd a thunk it?

 

512px-Animal_hearing_frequency_range.svg

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starise    368

Interesting info Rudi.

 

 

 

I was playing with the new Sasquatch plug in from Boz. After some point I couldn't hear the bass any more. I felt the bass. That's about when my windows started rattling. It felt like someone put a vibrator in my chair....a chair vibrator that is.

 

That was probably less than 30hz.  I don't believe much music is mixed to be heard above 8-10khz. Most people seem to be the most sensitive to the 1.5-3khz range. Something interesting I found that talks of the human voice and the fundamentals above it. 

https://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/76463/what-is-the-meaning-of-frequency-of-a-human-voice

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Rob Ash    477

 

Not that I am complaining, but this thread has gone right off the rails.

 

Apologies to the author.

 

 

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symphonious7    119
On 4/20/2017 at 0:23 PM, starise said:

 

Drinking from the bottle  helps the environment. Drinking directly from the bottle saves dirtying and washing a glass. You save money because you don't need to buy a glass. Not washing glasses saves precious water going to the loo drain and saves time in the kitchen. Rudi drinking from the bottle was genius. The only reason we buy glasses is there are women around. That also covers everything else, walking erect, wearing clothes, bathing etc.

 

This has to be true. I read it on the internet. :violinplay1:

 

 

BWAHAHAHAHA Loved this.  

 

I have a surround sound system I like to listen on, bluetooth earbuds for when I'm at work, and my car stereo.  It kind of bugs me to think most people listen to music on laptop speakers cause yeah, without the ability to get like... the biggest, clearest mixes imaginable, you're not gonna hear any bass really.  I mean even professional recordings from the 70's sometimes sound bassless on laptop speakers.  But what bugs me even more about the way people listen to music these days, (I've noticed mostly with people under 30) is that they don't even think of music as something you pay attention to.  It's always background to them.  

 

When I try to share music with my friends from work, I am expecting us to really sit and listen, I pick songs that are going somewhere, building to a climax, with great lines and instrumental sections along the way, I want them to experience this with me but it goes the same every time.  Press play.  10 seconds later "Yeah dude I dig this it's chill" and then they just start talking and I'm just like "YOU HAVEN'T EVEN HEARD THE SONG, WE HAVEN'T REACHED ONE CHORUS, WHAT DO YOU MEAN "I LIKE IT IT'S CHILL" YOU DON'T KNOW THE SONG YET  


Man... for musicians trying to really take people on a journey, or who want to make albums that tell a story or interlude like one huge opus, people just don't have the attention spans for it anymore.  And if they're listening on laptop speakers on top of that?  Yeesh...  it's depressing lol  

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starise    368

Rob, it's all good man. No need to apologize. Thanks for your thoughts.

 

Hi symphonious7, sorry I haven't met you yet. I really should get around to the meet and greet area. Honestly, the reason I don't is I'm not the best at greeting folk. WELCOME!

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

I was very young back in the 70's, but I still remember it. Here's my take on that time period. People were focused around music in the same way they're focused today on portable electronic devices ,wide screen TV's and video games. Back then it was one small black and white TV. We didn't get color until later, you only picked up maybe three channels on an antennae. The picture was grainy. The channel selections were maybe 1% of what we can get now, 8 track tape players, cassette tapes and vinyl records were the iphones of the 70's. That was all we had, but we lived for it and it seemed music was more special back then. This was probably because there were less choices, even in terms of who or what we listened to.There was this big wooden thing called a home entertainment center that looked like furniture and had a record player and radio in it. The record player could change records all by itself. You stacked them on the spindle and they dropped one at a time after the last record finished playing. You could put a stack of albums on it and have music for hours. 

 

Presently the choices are multiplied many times over. If you have feeds on your handheld device you might be getting the news, a dozen notifications from your social media, a notification that your favorite artist just released a track, the weather, you name it and it can be sent to you on your handheld device. Kids 5 years old learn to access media content on the dvd  player in the car, operate the TV remote control and they even have their own small devices they can use. EVERYTHING is asking for our attention. 

By the time these people get to puberty they are usually media zombies. They have been trained to access media instead of access the world around them. This seems to make them less attentive to one thing. This would only makes sense, because this is all they've ever known. I sometimes also wonder if this makes all data less relevant. An over abundance of anything can invite boredom. 

 

Add to this the quality, or lack of it in music programming along with the methods of delivery and I think we have the perfect storm. Thoughts anyone?

Edited by starise
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starise    368
On 4/22/2017 at 11:52 AM, TapperMike said:

Audio equipment.

It's still makes me wonder why or how Bang & Olufsen have survived.

 

I remember as a kid going around to various Hi Fi stores.  B&O had mediocre sound quality compared to everything in those shops.  Yet they sold surprisingly well.   It was all about looks.  The systems looked pretty   So it's not always about price point.  

 

My Brother in law spends a lot of money on home theater systems.  He has several to choose from for watching / listening pleasure.  Often I think he keeps them around to show off how many he has. I'll never understand why one room needs four distinctly different audio systems.  He's not in the music / television production industry, he's an investment consultant. like....... Bernie Madoff

 

 

 

 

I think this points to the fact that people can be sold on something based on a perception. The placebo effect? 

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Richard Tracey    252
4 hours ago, starise said:

Rob, it's all good man. No need to apologize. Thanks for your thoughts.

 

Hi symphonious7, sorry I haven't met you yet. I really should get around to the meet and greet area. Honestly, the reason I don't is I'm not the best at greeting folk. WELCOME!

 

Thanks for your comments.

 

I was very young back in the 70's, but I still remember it. Here's my take on that time period. People were focused around music in the same way they're focused today on portable electronic devices ,wide screen TV's and video games. Back then it was one small black and white TV. We didn't get color until later, you only picked up maybe three channels on an antennae. The picture was grainy. The channel selections were maybe 1% of what we can get now, 8 track tape players, cassette tapes and vinyl records were the iphones of the 70's. That was all we had, but we lived for it and it seemed music was more special back then. This was probably because there were less choices, even in terms of who or what we listened to.There was this big wooden thing called a home entertainment center that looked like furniture and had a record player and radio in it. The record player could change records all by itself. You stacked them on the spindle and they dropped one at a time after the last record finished playing. You could put a stack of albums on it and have music for hours. 

 

Presently the choices are multiplied many times over. If you have feeds on your handheld device you might be getting the news, a dozen notifications from your social media, a notification that your favorite artist just released a track, the weather, you name it and it can be sent to you on your handheld device. Kids 5 years old learn to access media content on the dvd  player in the car, operate the TV remote control and they even have their own small devices they can use. EVERYTHING is asking for our attention. 

By the time these people get to puberty they are usually media zombies. They have been trained to access media instead of access the world around them. This seems to make them less attentive to one thing. This would only makes sense, because this is all they've ever known. I sometimes also wonder if this makes all data less relevant. An over abundance of anything can invite boredom. 

 

Add to this the quality, or lack of it in music programming along with the methods of delivery and I think we have the perfect storm. Thoughts anyone?

 

I remember we had one of those entertainment centres as well. Loved it and playing all the old records my parents had, before I started getting my own. My first stereo was a Kenwood with the record deck on the bottom, you pressed a button and it came out. It had the best double tape deck ever. I did so many mixes on that, cause when you paused it, it went back a mili-second and blended with the previous part to perfection.

 

I used to record the charts from the radio and it was great, all this music, music I fell in love with and still love to this day. I moved on to more expensive stereos and technology took over my life - sometimes too much.

 

I think you re right about today's youth - everything is too instant and there is so much choice (TV channels, radio channels, everything). They are born to have a short attention span, which is why most music nowadays is fluffy throwaway move on to something else kind of stuff. The Now That's What I Call albums have gone from being a must buy when they started out to having probably one song that I like. I am trying to get my daughters into decent music, but they just listen to all the shut of the day.

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symphonious7    119

I wasn't born till 84, but somehow through music and old footage and interviews and my parents keeping lots of old things around, I've always felt connected to it.  I loved hearing your description of the  entertainment center and how people used to listen to records the same way that we would watch movies,  I always had this feeling that that's how it was. I would think to myself "there is no way so much attention has been put into every single second of these 70s records if it wasn't because they fully expected everyone to listen and scrutinize every detail,  and you always hear people talking about music that change their lives in that time period, I can't imagine a teenager today ever saying that a song had changed their life.   I feel like  Music used to be trying to communicate something transcendent and beautiful to the listener, it tried to push our emotions to a real place that made us feel alive and human, now everything is just trying to be "dope".   You do have your singers that seem as if they are attempting to go back to the old ways, Adele comes to mind, but in my opinion these attempts always fall short, and they appear as if they are going back to old records and trying to duplicate a feeling, rather than creating something  New and  exciting from their heart, which is why the older music tends to sound better because those people were not trying to copy something from the past, what they were doing at the time was new and exciting.   Sorry for no paragraphs, I'm using the microphone on my phone to make this post because I'm at work, no time to edit LOL  but yeah, really cool hearing about the entertainment centers and stuff, sometimes I wish I could've lived in that era instead of mine, but then I just think "with everything so sucky like this, it sure does make it easy to shine"...  then I feel motivated to take over the world and it's all good again haha

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Rob Ash    477
16 hours ago, symphonious7 said:

I wasn't born till 84, but somehow through music and old footage and interviews and my parents keeping lots of old things around, I've always felt connected to it.

 

 

The unfortunate reality about young (er... you are twenty years my junior) people like yourself, whom I admire, is that individuals (rarely) move populations. Likewise, synergy is a bitch. A child with an IPhone today has a virtually limitless selection of sources of stimulation available to them. The vast majority of these sources adhere, in order to remain at all relevant, to currently accepted norms with regard to the production and dissemination of content. That means that most of them cater to a shorter and shorter attention span. In order for there to be a generational change... for whole generations to be able to appreciate things which REQUIRE extended (by modern standards) contemplation, the controlling zeitgeist has to change. Younger generations will have to decide they want and appreciate forms of stimulation such as those being discussed here.

 

Which is likely to be difficult, in a world where the number of media outlets and marketers and merchandisers only increases. My TV service offers me access to more than three hundred discrete channels, and the opportunity to buy the right to view hundreds of additional channels. In addition to that, my TV service offer me access to tens of thousands of hours of free "on demand" content.

 

My radio service in my car is subscription based. More than 200 channels compete for space on my quick dial buttons, and more channels are added each year. Google not only offers access to billions of pages, with content being added exponentially, but it now offers answers to almost any question a person can conceive of in only a few seconds, if that long. YouTube has tens of millions of videos, most of them brief, which are, by and large, not being watched from beginning to end.

 

Catered content, across all platforms, increases and diversifies on almost a weekly basis.

 

If you ask me, generations unborn will never be able to return to "simpler" times, because to do so would require limiting their choices in a way that is impossible in our modern society. Without a major tectonic shift in the way societies exist and disseminate information now, I do not think we will see a resurgence of interest in anachronistic forms of entertainment.

 

 

Edited by RobAsh15

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symphonious7    119
2 hours ago, RobAsh15 said:

 

 

The unfortunate reality about young (er... you are twenty years my junior) people like yourself, whom I admire, is that individuals (rarely) move populations. Likewise, synergy is a bitch. A child with an IPhone today has a virtually limitless selection of sources of stimulation available to them. The vast majority of these sources adhere, in order to remain at all relevant, to currently accepted norms with regard to the production and dissemination of content. That means that most of them cater to a shorter and shorter attention span. In order for there to be a generational change... for whole generations to be able to appreciate things which REQUIRE extended (by modern standards) contemplation, the controlling zeitgeist has to change. Younger generations will have to decide they want and appreciate forms of stimulation such as those being discussed here.

 

Which is likely to be difficult, in a world where the number of media outlets and marketers and merchandisers only increases. My TV service offers me access to more than three hundred discrete channels, and the opportunity to buy the right to view hundreds of additional channels. In addition to that, my TV service offer me access to tens of thousands of hours of free "on demand" content.

 

My radio service in my car is subscription based. More than 200 channels compete for space on my quick dial buttons, and more channels are added each year. Google not only offers access to billions of pages, with content being added exponentially, but it now offers answers to almost any question a person can conceive of in only a few seconds, if that long. YouTube has tens of millions of videos, most of them brief, which are, by and large, not being watched from beginning to end.

 

Catered content, across all platforms, increases and diversifies on almost a weekly basis.

 

If you ask me, generations unborn will never be able to return to "simpler" times, because to do so would require limiting their choices in a way that is impossible in our modern society. Without a major tectonic shift in the way societies exist and disseminate information now, I do not think we will see a resurgence of interest in anachronistic forms of entertainment.

 

 

I actually fully agree and disagree at the same time, though it's a little difficult to explain what I mean.  It's kind of like... a theory I hold onto, perhaps it's viable, perhaps not, only time will tell but it's a vision I see in my head.  My wife and I are always looking for new bands that remind us of the old classic bands, not because they sound like them, but because they have the same elements, like each song being it's own special entity, the lyrics being clear and understandable and every line impacting you, unique instrumental choices that you go "whoa I never hear any band do that!"  consistency, and an evolution from album to album that seems as if they are honing in on their sound, not getting away from it.  There are other factors involved too, but bands that have these qualities would be bands like Queen, the Who, Harry Nilsson was like that, we've also noticed that the ability to "squeeze" energy out of a track, where the rises keep making your jaw drop, were the norm for alot of these bands.  

 

When I listen to GOOD music from today, which there is alot of, like animal collective, queens of the stone age, royal bangs, clutch, to name a few, you can actually find that one or more of those old elements is always missing.  Like, QOTSA I find to be really cool, their sound is very retro and unique, even having some of the elements I mentioned like interesting instrumental choices in each song, but I don't feel like I have heard them put out their "A Day at the Races" or their "Stairway to Heaven" like, it still is not reaching the level of the greats by consistently taking me somewhere different and new that has me on the edge of my seat, it's more like there are 2 or 3 songs I LOVE, a few I really appreciate, and a couple I'm "Meh" about, and that's literally all I've found with the exception of a band called "O Terno" from brazil.  

 

Ok am I saying that DOESN'T exist somewhere?  Well no, but here's another thing, you can tell many of these early bands rode on a sort of wave of "sense of purpose" or like.. I watch interviews with older bands and often times think "whoa, there's alot more life in those eyes than I ever see now adays, this person's energy is legit just... on fire!!!"  Some of the most iconic interviews these bands were showing how they sort of lived and carried themselves in ways that were as out there as their music.  So there is a believability there, something in your mind almost feels like these people tapped into something outside our current reality, at least, it doesn't sound as crazy to say that about Led Zeppelin as it does to say that about say Weezer.  (Though weezer did tap into that reality on their first couple of albums IMO)  

 

Ok so now you have the kids right?  Their attention spans, their materialism, their now now now mentality, all this, is a formiddable opponent, a juggernaut, a giant, it seems undefeatable yes I see that.  But every now and again you run across these comments on the internet, "I don't listen to the same stuff all my friends do, I like old music like the eagles!!  It just says something! All my friends make fun of me for it..."  That minority cry is small, but THERE.  It's big enough that you can see it is not dead, perhaps even growing, I work with a girl who says more and more of her friends are getting sick of their generations society, "My generation is immature and we suck" is beginning to be a common theme said by kids.  There is growing RESTLESSNESS.  I see it, I really do.  

 

I think what happens is we have bands these kids find who have one or more of these old elements, but not all of them.  Hell maybe there is someone who's put out one album worthy of such a goal, with a totally new sound and feel and a message and every song is different but amazing etc, can they follow up on it?  Can they perform the way Mick Jagger did, can they sing the way Bowie did?  As much as I want to humbly say "I'm sure that type of awesomeness is out there" I honestly don't see it, I search for it, I see people who seem to recognize the problem and give it a real fair honest effort, but I don't see a movement worthy of the 60's happening I really don't.  

 

So IF IT DID, if the right band came along and started putting out Dark Side of the Moon worthy, sgt pepper's worthy, album after album after album.   On stage they are truly captivating, they move like no one else, sing like no one else, say what no one else is saying, over and over and over.  I think if you can rev up the engines of that remnant, make them feel like they aren't being lame by listening to their parent's music, but cool cause they found the new sound.  The new punks, the new hippies, they found their voice, you might see the halo effect slowly happen.  I relate this alot to how christianity began, I mean how were you going to get stubborn legalistic jews to believe their messiah was actually here and start a whole movement?  Well he had to be the real deal, always saying the right thing, doing the right thing, proving he was as magnificent as his message was.  

 

Because it's not about the amount of people you impact, it's about the size OF the impact.  If you get a small handful of people to have a monumental life changing reaction to you that makes them compelled to excitedly and unabashedly show everyone they know and once they have gotten people hooked the excitement grows because the next album is even BETTER, and this keeps happening, things of a lesser quality will begin to look silly by comparison, bands will begin to hear this sound and go "Whoa, why aren't we doing that???"  The feeling of "it can't be done" would turn into "But those guys are doing it!!  Why can't I???"  

 

It's like pulling back a rubber band so when it's finally released it flies so much further, God does it all the time, heck it's kind of his thing :)  Obviously this is coming from the perspective of a guy who feels like he sees the kingdom of heaven everywhere and talks to God 24/7 so I'm either onto something or crazy off Jesus juice but, be I wrong, be I right, I create with this hope firmly placed in my heart, that we will see the biggest musical revival the world's ever known, because the rubber band is pulled back as far as it can go...

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