Jump to content
Rob Ash

Poppa's got a brand new bag...

Recommended Posts

Rob Ash    495

 

This might be a cool topic.

 

How does the fact that you are a musician, or a lyricist, or a music engineer, etc., affect your life? Do you engage in activities others cannot relate to the way you can, such as performing on stage? Do you hang out at certain places, with certain kinds of people, such as in my case ... 40 and 50 year old rock and metal fans all dressing up in jeans and black tees and going to metal and rock concerts? Do you, yourself wear certain clothes, or make up, or have tattoos, or wear your hair a certain way, because of your being a musician, or the kind of music you play?

 

Lately I've been getting bit a lot by the "retired in Florida" bug, and have been hanging out in flip-flops, sunglasses, baggy shorts and light weight tees. But, as a middle aged fan of hard rock and metal from the 80's and 90's, with a lot of history playing out with various amateur rock bands, I often wear jeans, black tees, leather jackets, along with boots of various types and design (but all rugged), thick leather belts with big shiny buckles, leather wrist bracers, etc.

 

I wear my hair long, in a style similar to the way Dee Snider wears his hair lately... pulled back straight from the peak, which in my case is receding... back into either a pony tail or lots of long loose curls held in place by Tresume' moose. This is not the only way I dress, but it remains the way I feel most comfortable... the way that makes me feel like myself, if that makes any sense.

 

I have rock and metal stations programmed on my radio in my car. I also have Public Radio, classical, and talk stations programmed, but rock and metal dominate my choices. My ringtones are all mostly taken from old rock and metal songs.

 

Over the years of my adult life, my love of hard rock music as well as my being a singer and guitarist, has affected everything from the bars I like to hang out in, to the kinds of movies I like to watch, to the kinds of cars I like to drive. I have an abiding affection for big, fat, loud motorcycles, muscle cars, rock and metal t-shirts, old grindhouse movies, fast guitars and loud amps, and of course.... sexy, strong women. 

 

The color, flavor, attitude and energy of hard rocking music from the 70's, 80's and 90's has permeated my life. I also have other interests and walk in other worlds, but I always come home to my world of hard rock and heavy metal music. I love it with a passion and intensity that has lasted for nearly 5 decades now. Give me an outdoor gathering, with a big bonfire going and a band playing good hard rocking music, with good earthy, devoted friends having good times, any day.

 

Lots of things have caught my interest in my life so far, Not just rock and metal, of course. But, because I have been a hard rock musician, playing in bands, for almost my whole life (since I was 16), I'd have to say that hard rock and metal have had the most significant effect on my tastes and lifestyle.

 

What about you?

 

 

Edited by Rob Ash
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dazzyt66    37

OK, I loved this. Substitute metal/rock for country (yeah, I can hear you all groaning now) and my life is pretty similar.

 

In the UK, following country music is easier nowadays with the sprawl of technology. Our kitchen internet radio is tuned to 94.3 KAT Country in Jefferson City, Missouri. Sad but true. My car streams all kind of country playlists (and KAT if I have decent 3G or 4g coverage) as well as my own collection on random loop which covers decades of country and I mean DECADES! I probably have most of the great Johnny Cash albums - the later American series being my faves.

 

Linked to this is a love of good old Irish folk songs (probably to do with my Welsh/Irish roots) so when we can, a flight to either Dublin or Belfast for a weekend of diddly dee and Guinness beckons (with quite often a fair mix of country covers thrown in) - awesome. You can't beat a song with a great story a la 'Streets of New York' or 'Black Velvet Band' or even a rendition of 'Folsom Prison' with just a guitarist and a banjo with the words 'sippin guiness' substituting 'drinking whiskey' in the second verse! Lol

 

Of course all this flows into the songs I write and the covers I play - although I'm also a sucker for good acoustic 80's/90s pop covers as my SoundCloud betrays!

 

And yeah, if I wouldn't look totally weird walking around Yorkshire in a Stetson n cowboy boots I'd wear em! Lol

 

Great thread I'm thinking.

Edited by Dazzyt66
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Richard Tracey    289

Ha ha - just as well I don't dress and try to emulate my favourite bands and period for music, or I would be getting some funny looks as I walked down the street.

My musical love and period was the early 80's, full of the New Romantics and their frilly shirts and make-up.

When I was younger I used to do my hair in that fashion, wore weird clothes (nothing as bad as theirs - my mum wouldn't allow it) and definitely no make-up.

Now-a-days I am very much short hair (which is very grey) and I grew a beard, to the disgust of my wife and kids.

In my job you need to be smart of appearance, but beards seem to be in at the moment, so took the chance of growing one as they didn't seem to mind.

I buy most of my clothes out of Superdry now as that is my favourite clothes shop and have a penchant for trainers, although I try to curb how many I want now.

I only go to the concerts I really really want to see, as my kids are too young still to take and they wouldn't want to go anyway.

Scotland has a big heavy rock/metal and Country scene, but to be honest, they are not for me.

Maybe once I release my music I can create a whole new scene - the boring dad scene, I am sure there are a lot of us out there:D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dazzyt66    37
18 minutes ago, Richard Tracey said:

once I release my music I can create a whole new scene - the boring dad scene, I am sure there are a lot of us out there:D

 

Amen brother!! Lol

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206

I love this thread, great topic.  And @Dazzyt66 I bet you'd never guess I LOVE old country!  (though I think I may have already told you)  But yeah I love that about myself haha, I seem like I'd be all hipster about it but no I'll cry my eyes out to a good heartfelt country song haha (though they went extinct in the 90's RIP)  

 

My musical tastes and stuff... affect who I am more than I can probably explain or understand...  When my friends were listening to Korn and Limp Bizkit and wearing Big Jinco and Kikwear jeans and gothic looking punky stuff, I was listening to Hendrix and zeppelin and wearing tie dye and bell bottoms.  Because the music I listen to is so.... groovy and... I dunno the word but it's like... I carry myself like the music I listen to.  I sort of glide as if there's a song I'm hearing that you're not, and I use 60's and  70's slang.  I was always drawn to the attitude of hippies, not the REALLY peacey lovey tree huggy ones, but the more... just laid back "chill maaaan" kinda hippies.  

 

Then I started liking even more glammy stuff like Bowie and Roxy Music and... others I can't think of but just, really glammy outrageous transcendent rock.  I got into this idea of... I dunno... the magical bard from outer space.  So I started cutting up socks and putting them on my arms, toe socks became gloves, I'd wear the big funky glasses and sometimes even a boa.  I guess I started thinking I was Marc Bolan or something haha  The thing is, I didn't stop.  I'm 33 and that still feels right to me, I don't FEEL normal, I feel like a force of nature sometimes, I feel like a whimsical creator of fantastic things, and I feel weird if I just dress normal too! haha If I go out in jeans and a tshirt (which I do sometimes) I'm just like "ughhhh I feel so noooormal... where are my arm warmers...." lol  

 

I think this basically related to what you were saying, I never really became the kind of fan of music where I tried to emulate the culture, but my style and personality couldn't be more affected by music, both mine and others.  

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob Ash    495

 

 

5 hours ago, symphonious7 said:

I think this basically related to what you were saying, I never really became the kind of fan of music where I tried to emulate the culture, but my style and personality couldn't be more affected by music, both mine and others.  

 

Nothing wrong with that, I think...B)

 

For me, I was so immersed in the life... wearing the clothes, listening to the music, who I knew, was friends with and loved.... where I hung out and what we all talked about... PLUS playing the music, eventually on stage, and for a while, even to the extent of being able to make a modest but workable living... for a few years, at least.

 

I mean, for the average none rock star god or goddess type... someone like Kid Rock, say... life leavens all of that. You grow up, get kids, need to work and earn at a level that sustains all of that... so it;s not like I didn't put on the suit and cut my hair at points to bring home the bacon... but in my case it was so ingrained into what I "really" loved, and what I thought of as my "real" self that it stayed with me all my life, to a greater or lesser extent. On top of that, as I have grown older and more self assured, that has only increased, as I return to my "roots', now that I am no longer so beholden to "the man"...

 

But, I agree that, for lots of folks not just musicians. a real, sincere love of music means that music will permeate and create not only a backdrop for, but also a framework for the structure of their lives.

 

And that's a very good thing...:thumbsup2:

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206
3 minutes ago, Rob Ash said:

 

 

 

Nothing wrong with that, I think...B)

 

For me, I was so immersed in the life... wearing the clothes, listening to the music, who I knew, was friends with and loved.... where I hung out and what we all talked about... PLUS playing the music, eventually on stage, and for a while, even to the extent of being able to make a modest but workable living... for a few years, at least.

 

I mean, for the average none rock star god or goddess type... someone like Kid Rock, say... life leavens all of that. You grow up, get kids, need to work and earn at a level that sustains all of that... so it;s not like I didn't put on the suit and cut my hair at points to bring home the bacon... but in my case it was so ingrained into what I "really" loved, and what I thought of as my "real" self that it stayed with me all my life, to a greater or lesser extent. On top of that, as I have grown older and more self assured, that has only increased, as I return to my "roots', now that I am no longer so beholden to "the man"...

 

But, I agree that, for lots of folks not just musicians. a real, sincere love of music means that music will permeate and create not only a backdrop for, but also a framework for the structure of their lives.

 

And that's a very good thing...:thumbsup2:

 

 

I really missed out on having a "scene".  In a sense it always made me a mysterious enigma to people, you could never get too close to me but the things I said were fascinating.  But because no excitement really trumped making the music for me, I tended to just retreat back to my studio.  I wouldn't say I regret this, to this day I think I still have a strong impact on people cause they can tell I really haven't gotten sucked into any culture anywhere, but at the same time I feel this little twinge when I think about it, like "should I have been more open to social stuff?"  It's like, when I think about who I am at a core level I'm happy with everything and how it turned out, but then you look through your facebook and you're like "I have noooooo photos of me hanging out with anyone, I have no core group of friends...." and it just makes ya wonder.  

 

But hey I make friends all the time now so whatever, I like being different.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rudi    591
On 7/29/2017 at 7:19 AM, Rob Ash said:

How does the fact that you are a musician, or a lyricist, or a music engineer, etc., affect your life? Do you engage in activities others cannot relate to the way you can, such as performing on stage? Do you hang out at certain places, with certain kinds of people, such as in my case ... 40 and 50 year old rock and metal fans all dressing up in jeans and black tees and going to metal and rock concerts? Do you, yourself wear certain clothes, or make up, or have tattoos, or wear your hair a certain way, because of your being a musician, or the kind of music you play?

 

No.

 

But its curious that you do, because clearly the culture that you share is no longer a youth culture. Its not even a frozen youth culture because it has developed beyond that. Yes I know people that dress as you describe and are part of a loose peer community. Its seems to be singular.

 

The former bassist from Blown Out was into mod/ska culture. He bought scooters to renovate & sell, always keeping back 1 or 2 for himself. He wore t-shirts with RAF roundels on them. He wanted the band to go this way I think also, because we played some of that music. Unlike yours, this is an old youth culture.

 

My own sense of style is volatile. When my hair loss reached a certain low bar, I cut it off and started wearing hats for practical reasons (heat loss in winter. sun protection in summer). I wore all sorts of hats before settling on pork pies. I just thought they looked great. I had to order the first few from the USA. I have never seen anyone else in the UK wear one of these ever. So I do not knowingly conform to a peer precedent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob Ash    495

 

 

1 hour ago, Rudi said:

No.

 

But its curious that you do, because clearly the culture that you share is no longer a youth culture. Its not even a frozen youth culture because it has developed beyond that. Yes I know people that dress as you describe and are part of a loose peer community. Its seems to be singular.

 

 

There is a level of analysis going on in this line that eludes me, Rudi, I must admit.

 

I fell in deep love with rock music at the tender age of oh, perhaps 9, perhaps 10. I joined my first rock band at age 16.

 

Although I have pursued many diverse interests in my life, both indoors and outdoors, and ones more, or less active.... hard rock and metal music, and the accouterments, et al, that go along with that "scene" (a term I use here purely for lack of having a better one spring to mind) remained a deep and abiding love of mine for the next 40 or so years. I love the shows. I love the bands. I love the songs. I love the posters and the clothes and the card and the girls... I love denim and leather and chrome and motorcycles. I love playing rock and metal music. I love loud, fast guitars and high wattage rigs. I love it all. I always have.

 

I couldn't give a crap about what other people think, by and large. I am, maybe, a bit touchy if someone says bad things about my music.

 

What's so hard to ken? Some people love flowers. Some birds. Some their little toy dogs. My wife buys furniture and clothes and special treats and all sorts of oddities I cannot relate to at all, all for our pugs. She loves them. A lot. That much I understand completely.

 

Not sure I'm following, my friend.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rudi    591
1 hour ago, Rob Ash said:

What's so hard to ken? Some people love flowers. Some birds. Some their little toy dogs. My wife buys furniture and clothes and special treats and all sorts of oddities I cannot relate to at all, all for our pugs. She loves them. A lot. That much I understand completely.

 

Not sure I'm following, my friend.

 

Not sure I understand your confusion either Rob.

I was saying that the culture you identify with is :

 

1/ not a youth culture

 

2/ appears to be unique

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob Ash    495

 

 

10 hours ago, Rudi said:

1/ not a youth culture

 

2/ appears to be unique

 

 

There is much I could say to this. None of it angry or negative. I understand how someone could look upon my interests and passions and deem them to be niche oriented. I would contend, if we were face to face, say, and words passed more speedily than they do here, that such is not the case. Rather than a long dissertation, however, I will content myself with a few bullet points which may entice you to perhaps google gently for more information.

 

- A passion for hard driving rock and metal music is often a generational interest. Although the first fans of metal (a genre that did not exist before the mid 1960's) are all in their late 50's and 60's now, their kids, and their grand kids are not. Although such is not universal, the fact that a love of metal or hard rock is often passed down from one generation to the next has even been spoken of in a number of documentaries. A significant example of this would be "The History Of Metal", a 6 part, 6 hour documentary aired on AXSTV this past year, which outlines the origins of, and evolution of metal music though the decades. In the Scandinavian countries in Europe, I would even go so far as to say this phenomenon is more prevalent than it is in America.

 

- Their are many, many sub-cultural groups in America that have a specific style, mode or form of dress that is identified specifically with that sub group. The fast that I dress a certain way, or wear my hair long, as I do, is no different than someone who wears camouflage and boots and considers themselves a hunter, or someone who wears a hat lampooned with fishing lures who considers themselves an avid fisher. Bikers have their chaps, leather and steel and chrome festooned jackets. Science fiction, comics and fantasy fans have their cosplay outfits (all hand made with incredible passion and detail) and show or movie related paraphernalia.

 

- Chess clubs. Bridge clubs. Or more comparably... car clubs, or mountain biking enthusiasts, to name just a couple of examples... each, clearly it's own unique accouterments. Some are simply more (or less) expensive, extensive or elaborate.

 

Passion is passion. Each individual, if they are lucky, is gifted with both the freedom and the ability to define their passions according to their personal desires.

 

Perhaps I am still not understanding you, Rudi, but, I hardly consider my own humble interests to be at all unique, in terms of how I remain loyal to what I love, or the notion that following that passion invokes (for many) a certain mode of dress or behavior.

 

 

Edited by Rob Ash
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206
11 hours ago, Rob Ash said:

 

 

 

 

There is a level of analysis going on in this line that eludes me, Rudi, I must admit.

 

 

 

I feel 

Edited by symphonious7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206

Ugh... I can't edit that one right... it was just dumb I thought I knew what Rob meant but I was way off, then I tried to edit it and it froze on me and like put the cursor in the quotes and just.... *sigh*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206
8 minutes ago, Rob Ash said:

 

 

 

 

There is much I could say to this. None of it angry or negative. I understand how someone could look upon my interests and passions and deem them to be niche oriented. I would contend, if we were face to face, say, and words passed more speedily than they do here, that such is not the case. Rather than a long dissertation, however, I will content myself with a few bullet points which may entice you to perhaps google gently for more information.

 

-

 

 

There are those guys out there that seem like they're just... hanging on to hard to their youth.  I've worked with a couple older guys I thought were just kinda... goofy how they kept trying to seem like "Yeah man just think of me as your bro dude I'm just a cool young rocker like you chyaaaa" but I've also met guys who carry themselves that way and they own it, and its like the only way you could imagine them cause their personality fits it, you can tell they eat sleep and breathe it, and I have major respect for those dudes.  I've never met you in person, but judging by the unapologetic way you describe it, I'm guessing you're one of those dudes lol

(oh and sometimes the styles the goofy guys pick are just... TOO like... they weren't even cool back THEN bro! lol)

Edited by symphonious7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rudi    591
16 hours ago, Rob Ash said:

 

 

 

 

There is much I could say to this. None of it angry or negative. I understand how someone could look upon my interests and passions and deem them to be niche oriented. I would contend, if we were face to face, say, and words passed more speedily than they do here, that such is not the case. Rather than a long dissertation, however, I will content myself with a few bullet points which may entice you to perhaps google gently for more information.

 

- A passion for hard driving rock and metal music is often a generational interest. Although the first fans of metal (a genre that did not exist before the mid 1960's) are all in their late 50's and 60's now, their kids, and their grand kids are not. Although such is not universal, the fact that a love of metal or hard rock is often passed down from one generation to the next has even been spoken of in a number of documentaries. A significant example of this would be "The History Of Metal", a 6 part, 6 hour documentary aired on AXSTV this past year, which outlines the origins of, and evolution of metal music though the decades. In the Scandinavian countries in Europe, I would even go so far as to say this phenomenon is more prevalent than it is in America.

 

- Their are many, many sub-cultural groups in America that have a specific style, mode or form of dress that is identified specifically with that sub group. The fast that I dress a certain way, or wear my hair long, as I do, is no different than someone who wears camouflage and boots and considers themselves a hunter, or someone who wears a hat lampooned with fishing lures who considers themselves an avid fisher. Bikers have their chaps, leather and steel and chrome festooned jackets. Science fiction, comics and fantasy fans have their cosplay outfits (all hand made with incredible passion and detail) and show or movie related paraphernalia.

 

- Chess clubs. Bridge clubs. Or more comparably... car clubs, or mountain biking enthusiasts, to name just a couple of examples... each, clearly it's own unique accouterments. Some are simply more (or less) expensive, extensive or elaborate.

 

Passion is passion. Each individual, if they are lucky, is gifted with both the freedom and the ability to define their passions according to their personal desires.

 

Perhaps I am still not understanding you, Rudi, but, I hardly consider my own humble interests to be at all unique, in terms of how I remain loyal to what I love, or the notion that following that passion invokes (for many) a certain mode of dress or behavior.

 

 

 

No. Your looking at what I said inside out & back to front. Every way but the straightforwards way I intended. :(

 

First of all. I am not criticizing anybody. 

Secondly. When you quoted me you missed out the qualifying line. Which was

 

I was saying that the culture you identify with is :

 

1/ not a youth culture

 

2/ appears to be unique

 

So when you say

Quote

I hardly consider my own humble interests to be at all unique,

 

You are answering outside of the context I used.

 

That metal, heavy metal. and all the sub genres that I dont understand originated as PART of youth culture is not pertinent now. When I first saw Deep Purple in 1970 nobody dressed the way you describe there. We were mostly all still hippies. We dressed just the same at a Bert Jansch concert.

I dont know metal culture anywhere near as well as you do Rob. Nor have I seen the documentary. Maybe I dont need to see the documentary. I was there at the onset after all.

 

Now please relax. I've got a life to lead and I'd like to get on with it.

I hope we are straight now.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob Ash    495

 

 

On 8/7/2017 at 0:23 PM, Rudi said:

Now please relax. I've got a life to lead and I'd like to get on with it.

I hope we are straight now.

 

>snort!>

 

There's nothing provocative about that line, for sure.

 

Last time I checked, friend Rudi, this is a discussion forum.

 

I'd offer to avoid your posts altogether in the future, but that would not please me, and since you remain safely on the opposite side of a large ocean, I feel safe in saying, ever so gently...

 

Go pee up a rope.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rob Ash    495

 

 

On 8/6/2017 at 7:03 PM, symphonious7 said:

There are those guys out there that seem like they're just... hanging on to hard to their youth.  I've worked with a couple older guys I thought were just kinda... goofy how they kept trying to seem like "Yeah man just think of me as your bro dude I'm just a cool young rocker like you chyaaaa" but I've also met guys who carry themselves that way and they own it, and its like the only way you could imagine them cause their personality fits it, you can tell they eat sleep and breathe it, and I have major respect for those dudes.  I've never met you in person, but judging by the unapologetic way you describe it, I'm guessing you're one of those dudes lol

(oh and sometimes the styles the goofy guys pick are just... TOO like... they weren't even cool back THEN bro! lol)

 

 

I'm not at all sure how to take this. But, between your back handed compliments, and Rudi trying to tell me take a chill pill, I'm beginning to wish I hadn't penned this post.

 

;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
symphonious7    206
1 hour ago, Rob Ash said:

 

 

 

 

I'm not at all sure how to take this. But, between your back handed compliments, and Rudi trying to tell me take a chill pill, I'm beginning to wish I hadn't penned this post.

 

;)

I can't backanded compliment what I've never seen!  lol  I was saying some dudes pull that style off and some look silly, I have no IDEA if you fall into either category, but I'm guessing you pull it off, cause it sounds like it's in your blood.  B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×