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Analysis Of A Little Dab'i Do


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Hi

A summary of a discussion on a Little Dab'I Do...

http://forums.songstuff.com/index.php?showtopic=12852

FORM

Lazz: to me it's AAB - this is what I hear:

1st A Section:

24 bars

made of three 8 bar sections

(harmonically - the same 4 bar pattern is repeated - with a second ending)

And the last 8 bars of each A section works as a refrain

(That's where the familiar Little Dab'll Do bit is sung)

not useful to think of the 'Little Dab'll Do' vocal section as a chorus

because if we are thinking 'musically' we need to recognise that it is not a seperate section at all

it is part of the 24 bar A section and repeats the same chord changes

2nd A Section:

exactly the same as the first

24 bars

with the last 8 being refrain

all that repetition of the same basic 4 bar pattern can become a bit boring especially by the time we get to the end of the second A section

so it is with very welcome and intended relief that we finally get a B section

B Section:

16 bars

1st 8 bars goes somewhere different musically - which is nice

2nd 8 bars is a reprise of the refrain - which is reassuring and reaffirms the song

So - to me - I would sketch out the structure for this song as AAB

A1: 24 bars - A2: 24 bars - B: 16 bars

John: To be discussed...

a) Mood

B) Melody

When you listen to the track the melody, as Lazz mentioned, changes to accent the refrain lines (the alternative ending that lazz mentioned)

We can build on this topic.... I can summarize in this post.

Cheers

John

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I think it is worth noting the fact now Dena (Venus) has added the lyrics for us, that she uses the terms 'verse', 'chorus', 'bridge' and 'coda'.

And I believe this illustrates non-musical thinking about lyrics.

(sorry, Dena, no slight intended - just observations in the light of our earlier discussions)

As well as a conceptual trap set-up through applying these terms a priori - before really taking a good analytical look at what's actually going on in terms of structure.

'coda' is right

but 'verse', 'chorus' and 'bridge' aren't really helpful as tools in this here case.

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Hey Lazz

Yep. The notional lyrical layout does not match the musical structure. As mentioned earlier in your comments, musically the form is definitely AAB.

Interesting that it should be written as verse - chorus form... but then many writers are not aware of forms, and often don't realize the tie between the lyrics and music in this way.

Just an observation :)

Cheers

John

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  • 2 weeks later...
'coda' is right

but 'verse', 'chorus' and 'bridge' aren't really helpful as tools in this here case.

Using reference points like V1, V2, Pre1, Pre2, Ch1, B, etc, etc, allows not just individuals who are working with software to tab they're work for quick wave reference, but it also allows collaborators to "sync" with one another. It identifies changes in lyrics and music. If a collaborator asked me "can you increase dbs or change these lines in A," I'd say, "I have no idea what you're taking about and you need to be more specific."

This also bring about an interesting idea that songwriting processes are no longer limited to sitting down with your guitar and a paper and pencil. Songwriting now, it seems, is beginning to envelope technology and production scheme from the start.

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Using reference points like V1, V2, Pre1, Pre2, Ch1, B, etc, etc, allows not just individuals who are working with software to tab they're work for quick wave reference, but it also allows collaborators to "sync" with one another. It identifies changes in lyrics and music. If a collaborator asked me "can you increase dbs or change these lines in A," I'd say, "I have no idea what you're taking about and you need to be more specific."

Whatever works for you is beautiful.

I don't work with 'software to tab' and have no idea what that means.

If someone used such indicators as 'V1, V2, Pre1, Pre2, Ch1, B, etc, etc' in a conversation with me about an AAB structure, I would be facing the same challenge as you and would have to figure out exactly what they meant by asking a few questions. Then I would simply have to accept the fact that we speak different songwriting languages, modify the terms I use accordingly for that particular person in that particular context, and never mention it again. (I hope). Not unless they were at all interested in broadening their palette.

I am a fan of your song, Dena, but an analysis of it is poorly served by an insistence on those limited concepts of verse-chorus-bridge. It sure doesn't stop your song being a good one, but neither does it work as well as it could to help anyone else properly understand what's going on with it as a song. Which is what retro-spective analysis is for. They may work well enough in terms of structure for the amateur bed-room lyricist (and I mean that as words-only) but a song is a marriage of words with music, and being stuck on using those terms in that way underlines the validity of complaints that 'many writers are not aware of forms' and that they 'often don't realize the tie between the lyrics and music in this way'.

What also seems readily apparent is that by holding such opinion I am most definitely in a minority amongst participants on all the song-writing web-sites of which I am aware. But I am a little devil who doesn't care about things like that. All I care is being able to work effectively and productively within a professional environment. That's a place where we need to share the same language.

Songwriting now, it seems, is beginning to envelope technology and production scheme from the start.

That's an interesting point.

In truth, this has been happening for so long now that I would call it established.

It is the domestic penetration and availability of technology which is more currently significant, I think, not only because it enables people to develop their talents to a degree that would have been impossible before, but also because most do this completely disconnected from the river of song-writing tradition - and that's a shame.

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