Jump to content

Your Ad Could Be Here

Question For Lyricists...


Recommended Posts

Hey guys

It's common to hear a musician saying that they are experimenting with or learning music of a new genre.... yet I notice that lyricists don't tend to.

Is this because lyricists don't experiment in this way? Are they unaware of differences between the lyrics of different musical genres? They don't think they need to?

be interested in your views.

Cheers

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't really put my lyrics to music until I sit down with a band and get a feel for how they want to play the song. I'm fine with going with whatever flow flows naturally and a lot of times it's all about just finding that common ground. I wouldn't say lyricists don't experiment (lord knows I do some really weird shit to come up with some sort of "new song formula") but it can be a little harder (for me anyway) to experiment with lyrics as opposed to experiment with guitar

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure, I experiment with different styles, I might to a heavy metal lyric with lots of fancy words and imagery, and then I might write a desperate, more hardcore lyric which is more heartfelt, and then I might write a really easy-going and fun pop-lyric. But I can't use all of these in my band ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me, there is a different style and mindset when purposely trying to write in a particular genre. This affects the subject matter as well as the structure of the lyrics. I would write very different lyrics if trying to write a Country lyric as opposed to a Jazz, Blues or Pop lyric. Having said that, when writing in a less restrictive style such as stream of conscious writing, the resulting lyrics might be adaptable to a wide variety of genres. I would like to think that some lyrics are beyond genre and have a universal appeal. What do you think? Are there some lyrics you can think of that have cross genre appeal?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me, there is a different style and mindset when purposely trying to write in a particular genre. This affects the subject matter as well as the structure of the lyrics. I would write very different lyrics if trying to write a Country lyric as opposed to a Jazz, Blues or Pop lyric. Having said that, when writing in a less restrictive style such as stream of conscious writing, the resulting lyrics might be adaptable to a wide variety of genres. I would like to think that some lyrics are beyond genre and have a universal appeal. What do you think? Are there some lyrics you can think of that have cross genre appeal?

Most definitely... vocal trance lyrics are very hypnotic

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

For me, the inspiration for a lyric comes in different ways. I used to write to more of a country melody, but didn't know why. You see, I have never really listened to country music. The old style of country, not the new stuff if anything.

Yea, studying a technique or genre would be helpfull. Perhaps I have been a student of folk music, or rock. Lately I've been saying things like "listen to this part" as in Manfred Manns "Blinded By THe Light". And then I will make a comment on how the odd words worked in the lyric, one of my favorite songs for years, and weird lyrics to boot.

But really, is it so much the style of the lyric that makes a song fit a genre? I would think that if a genre was limited in the subject matter of the lyrics it would grow tiring.

All I can say is that if you live in America, don't bother going to Barnes and Noble to find anything on lyric writing. Somebody needs to write a "Music Section for Dummies" how to manual for bookstores to follow.

Remember, when you listen to a band, it's just one point of view on that genre. To really study it, you'ld need to listen to hundreds of songwriters which would hopefully take years. Well, no, it would take years. Intellectually knowing music does not a musician make.

I write. The goal is to keep the pencil moving. If someone comes along that sounds new, I listen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey

I wouldn't say that it is so much the style of the lyric that matches a genre as so much as some genre's are quite strongly defined by structure, content, type of rhyme, theme etc. Nothing is a hard and fast rule... but you can say what typifies a genre.

For example, if you wanted to write a goth song the themes tend to be dark, emo introspection and cutting, rap tends to have an in your face aggression and viewing women as sexual objects with a strong but simple rhyme scheme and a lot of slang or street terminology and so on... These are NOT hard and fast rules... but they do give you a ballpark.

It certainly doesn't mean you can't mix and match, but just like the music, there are aspects that typify each genre... and by understanding them create lyrics which can more easily span multiple genres or hone in on specific genres. Cross pollination from genres is after all a common way to reach for something new musically... but the same applies lyrically.

MP, the mere fact that you wrote to country melodies would effect the kind of lyric you would produce in terms of rhythm and phrasing... and perhaps the mood of the lyric.

Keeping the pencil moving is a good start. There are lots of song forms and techniques to learn about... but equally it is useful to know when typically those techniques are used in specific genres...

I do think lyrics are sometimes more portable than music... but like most things in songwriting, that depends on the genre!

Cheers

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I write lyrics probably in an unusual way. If I want to capture a certain mood I'll listen to a select few songs that capture this mood and I can write with it as a backdrop to make sure I'm maintaining this certain mood I want to capture. I definitely study up on how other people structure their lyrics and if I like a certain style I'll try to integrate that style into my writing. I'm also thinking the reason why it's harder to experiment with lyrics than say guitar is that there's no "jam session" with lyrics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey

I wouldn't say that it is so much the style of the lyric that matches a genre as so much as some genre's are quite strongly defined by structure, content, type of rhyme, theme etc. Nothing is a hard and fast rule... but you can say what typifies a genre.

For example, if you wanted to write a goth song the themes tend to be dark, emo introspection and cutting, rap tends to have an in your face aggression and viewing women as sexual objects with a strong but simple rhyme scheme and a lot of slang or street terminology and so on... These are NOT hard and fast rules... but they do give you a ballpark.

It certainly doesn't mean you can't mix and match, but just like the music, there are aspects that typify each genre... and by understanding them create lyrics which can more easily span multiple genres or hone in on specific genres. Cross pollination from genres is after all a common way to reach for something new musically... but the same applies lyrically.

MP, the mere fact that you wrote to country melodies would effect the kind of lyric you would produce in terms of rhythm and phrasing... and perhaps the mood of the lyric.

Keeping the pencil moving is a good start. There are lots of song forms and techniques to learn about... but equally it is useful to know when typically those techniques are used in specific genres...

I do think lyrics are sometimes more portable than music... but like most things in songwriting, that depends on the genre!

Cheers

John

I think once you acknowledge a genre in your own lyric, you limit that lyric in what you're actually trying to say. I write to write, how it comes out is how it was meant to come out. When I write in the mind frame of a certain genre I feel as though I can't really express what I'm trying to say. I agree that there are general rules of thumb as far as lyrical content when exploring different genres, but I've never been one to lump my own lyrics in a certain genre as I write a lot of times to silence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I only write lyrics, and I have never made a song, I think I do have more freedom with my writing than someone that is writing music for his/her band.

Some of my lyrics come off as slow and soft, others loud and aggressive. Some are full of love, others full of anger. Some sound simple enough, that I could probably sing them, others sound like Disturbed meats Ozzy, and I can't transform what I hear in my head out loud to others.

I think most writers do write more than one style, but when they are writing for a band, the lyrics that get noticed are the ones the band plays - so unless the band can come at you with multiple different styles - generally one genre is settled in on.

This is all my opinion, nothing more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

Your Ad Could Be Here



  • Current Donation Goals

    • Raised $1,040
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By continuing to use our site you indicate acceptance of our Terms Of Service: Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy: Privacy Policy, our Community Guidelines: Guidelines and our use of Cookies We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.