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Moving Home, Moving Home Recording Studio


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It’s typical. Just I am happy with my home studio, I have to strip it down and move the whole fecking thing. Grrr.

 

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It had to be done so… just suck it up and get on with it, John. (Talking to myself in the 3rd person now too!)

 

Moving house can be a stressful time for anyone, especially if you are a musician and have to rebuild your home recording studio. It can feel like a daunting task, but with a little bit of planning and effort, you can have your new studio up and running in no time. In this blog post, I will explain what you should do, to help guide you through the process of rebuilding your home recording studio after moving house.

 

Moving Your Studio

Packing

Step 1: Label All Your Cables

The first step in taking your home recording studio apart is to label your cables. This can be a pretty time-consuming process, but it is very worthwhile and will pay you back many times for that initial effort.

 

I use a color scheme and naming convention. Remember to label power supplies to avoid a real headache later. Power distribution unit cables don’t need labelled. Everything else does! I recommend investing in some multi core cable. I generally used balanced cable to reduce noise but I have a couple of unbalanced multi cores too. Remember to label USB cables, HDMI, MIDI, network, even USB hubs if you have more than one.

 

Step 2: Disconnect Cables and Pack Cables, Hubs, Power Supplies
I packed actively used cables in separate boxes from your spare cables. Label what cables are in what box. It makes life much easier.

 

I keep unused cables separated into type and stored in a plastic drawer tidy (audio), a box each for USB, MIDI and network cable, and I store multicores and power cable in an old laundry hamper (no laundry in it of course!)

 

I also use a tool tidy with many compartments to store all connectors.

 

Pack hubs, power supplies and miscellaneous electrical items. Mark on the outside of the box what is in it.

 

Step 3: Pack Gear

Where you can use original boxes and packing materials. If this is not possible, use larger boxes with lots of packing, and then some more. Where the original boxes are not used… mark on the box what is in it!

 

Unpacking

Step 1: Assess the Space

The first step in rebuilding your home recording studio is to assess the space you have available. It is important to take measurements of the room to ensure that all of your equipment will fit comfortably. You should also take note of the room's acoustics and any soundproofing that may be required.

 

Once you have assessed the space, you can begin to plan the layout of your studio. Consider the placement of your equipment, such as your computer, audio interface, and monitors, as well as any acoustic treatment you may need to install.

 

Step 2: Unpack and Organize

The next step is to unpack all of your music gear and organize it in the new space. This can be a time-consuming process, but it is important to take your time and make sure that everything is organized properly.

 

Start by unpacking the essential items, such as your computer, audio interface, and monitors. Then, move on to unpacking your microphones, cables, and other accessories. It is important to keep all of your cables organized to avoid any confusion or frustration later on.

 

Step 3: Set Up Your Equipment

Once everything is unpacked and organized, it is time to set up your equipment. This can be a complex process, especially if you have a lot of gear. It is important to take your time and make sure that everything is connected properly.

 

Start by connecting your audio interface to your computer and installing any necessary drivers. Then, connect your monitors and set them up in the correct position. Finally, connect your microphones, instruments, and any other gear you have.

 

Step 4: Test and Troubleshoot

After everything is set up, it is important to test your equipment and troubleshoot any issues that may arise. This can be a frustrating process, but it is essential to ensure that your studio is functioning properly.

Start by testing your monitors and adjusting them as needed. Then, test your microphones and instruments to ensure that they are working properly. Finally, test your recording software and make any necessary adjustments to ensure that everything is working as it should be.

 

Step 5: Install Acoustic Treatment

Once your equipment is set up and functioning properly, it is time to install any necessary acoustic treatment. This can include sound-absorbing panels, bass traps, and diffusers.

Acoustic treatment is essential to ensure that your recordings sound the best they can. It helps to reduce unwanted reflections and echoes, resulting in a more natural and balanced sound.

 

Step 6: Organize Your Cables

The final step in rebuilding your home recording studio is to organize your cables. This can be a time-consuming process, but it is important to keep your cables organized to avoid any confusion or frustration later on. Trying to track crosstalk issues can be a pain, so a bit of thought now can save you a lot of problems later!

 

Start by labeling your cables and keeping them organized by type. Then, use cable ties or Velcro straps to keep them neat and tidy. Finally, consider using a cable management system to keep your cables organized and out of sight.

 

Rebuilding your home recording studio after moving house can be a daunting task, but with a little bit of planning and effort, you can have your new studio up and running in no time. Remember to assess the space, unpack and organize, set up your equipment, test and troubleshoot, install acoustic treatment, and organize your cables. With these steps, you can create a functional and inspiring workspace for your music.


Progress With My Studio

 

Currently I am part way through this process (mid-step 3). I will be posting my progress.

 

The space for my new studio is a bit smaller, and the room is pretty boxy with 2 windows and a large storage area at one end. Not entirely ideal but workable.

 

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There are just enough power sockets. The space will need some sound proofing, mainly dealing with those windows, but more to the point it will need some acoustic treatment in the form of bass traps, breaking up of the parallel surfaces.

 

Sound proofing wise, there is little I can do. The most effective is by using speaker stands with the speakers sitting on thick acoustic foam to reduce the mechanical coupling that transmits so much sound, particularly bass frequencies. Luckily the deadening installed in the walls and door are pretty good, and the door is a tight fit with acoustic seal reducing much of the spill. Spill through the floor, ceiling and windows are a different matter.

 

I have ordered some custom bass traps, plus angled, removable, deep baffles for the windows (by making them angled we break up the parallel surfaces). Two birds with one stone for the windows. Modern double glazing is a good start, but a reasonable acoustic design sees the window baffle become effective for sound proofing and in their contribution to room acoustics. By using perforated surface board we can make them tuned to the hot frequencies of this space, determined by the shape and dimensions of the room. The same goes for the other room baffles. I  toyed with buying off the shelf traps but I can design and have custom baffles built that should be better if only because they are designed and built for this specific space. Cheaper too.

 

Otherwise I might add some acoustic density foam plus boards for the corners. I want the room relatively bright, but not too bright, with a short natural reverb. Foam panels don’t do much at for sound proofing (reducing audio spill), but the 2” deep panels of acoustic foam are pretty useful for improving room acoustics as part of a broader acoustic treatment.

 

I am limited on what I can do, but I can at least improve the room acoustics.

 

I also plan on a moveable heavy baffle, on heavy castor wheels. That can be used to improve vocal isolation and to greatly break up the parallel surfaces in the room. There’s no rush on this. It can be built after the studio.

 

The acoustic treatments are practical, not aesthetic. However, they are all moveable. Baffles can all be moved/removed (so I can get them fitted after I connect up the studio). Foam tiles will all be pinned or fitted with spray adhesive (don’t worry, my gear will be safe).

 

And so moving day sees furniture arrive, boxes of gear, moving boxes and miles of cables. I am so glad I labelled all the important stuff, difficult stuff and as best as I could. Still, it’s a mess.

 

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Yes, I am that bearded old bald guy! Time flies when you run a music website. I started Songstuff when I was 33! Eek! And yes, two cups of tea on an equipment rack. Bad Moxey.

 

So I started unpacking, putting equipment in place and beginning to connect up. I can run much of Songstuff from my iPad, and I use that for mobile draft recordings too, but I need to get one of my PCs up and running. I am also desperate to get my Nord Grand functioning so I can soothe my soul with some keyboard work while I get the rest going.

 

Pretty soon I am at this stage:

 

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The  live-streaming computer is partially set up. All microphones, stands and most guitars etc are outside the studio space. Power is generally routed.
 

I have some cable management to install at stage 6 that will help. I use metal wire cages under the desks. That allows me to separate power, audio and control cables, with a little thought and some Velcro cable ties. Basically, power hangs underneath, attached by Velcro, audio in the cage, control attached to wire near where it connects to the desk. This will maintain about 10cm (4”) between cable groups.

 

That’s all from me for now.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

 

 

 

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Thanks! 
 

Bloody hell, it just occurred to me, in about 18 months, Songstuff will be 25 years old! Eek!

 

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I absolutely hate moving my studio. I did it in September 2021, again in January 2022, and will probably have to in another 8 - 12 months. I took pictures and documented everything (like you), so that I could do even basic things like reassembling the main desk. Hoping this one's permanent for you and that you can create good work there.

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  • Editors

Glad to see the progress with your move and studio set up bud. This post is very useful since I just moved this week (as you know) and I should start setting up the studio over the next couple weeks. Although, that's one hell of a set up to set up for you there. damn

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11 hours ago, Steve Mueske said:

I absolutely hate moving my studio. I did it in September 2021, again in January 2022, and will probably have to in another 8 - 12 months. I took pictures and documented everything (like you), so that I could do even basic things like reassembling the main desk. Hoping this one's permanent for you and that you can create good work there.


Thanks Steve! Fingers crossed.

 

11 hours ago, Mahesh said:

Glad to see the progress with your move and studio set up bud. This post is very useful since I just moved this week (as you know) and I should start setting up the studio over the next couple weeks. Although, that's one hell of a set up to set up for you there. damn

 

Thanks! I have a lot of recording to do! It took ages to put together. I have a bunch of stuff to sell. Amps, monitors, possibly an analog desk, a bunch of other things, but we’ll see.

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